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The lawyer confirmed the presence of Vinnik in San Francisco

Citizen of the Russian Federation Alexander Vinnik, who was transferred to Greece by a court decision in Paris, was immediately sent from Athens to the United States, TASS reports citing French lawyer Frederic Belo.

According to him, the plane made a technical landing in Boston and then flew to San Francisco. The defendant does not have funds for a private lawyer in the United States, so his defense is entrusted to state lawyers, Belo added.

Earlier it was reported that Vinnik was taken to Boston on a private plane, he was given the opportunity to call home, after which he was transferred to San Francisco.

The day before, it was reported that Vinnik sent from France to Greece. In the United States, he faces 55 years in prison.

Recall that Vinnik was arrested in Greece at the request of the United States in 2017. The Russian is accused of creating a cryptocurrency exchange. It is noted that billions of dollars could be laundered through it. In 2020, Vinnik was extradited to France. There he was sentenced to five years.

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For immigrants fleeing gender-based violence, it’s a long road to asylum in the US

“MuiTypography-root-229 MuiTypography-h1-234″>For immigrants fleeing gender-based violence, it’s a long road to asylum in the USThe WorldApril 18, 2022 · 1:30 PM EDT

At a playground in San Francisco, Deisy Ramírez reflects on how she found safety here after fleeing captivity in Guatemala, Nov. 22, 2021.

Tyche Hendricks/KQED

Deisy Ramírez woke before dawn on the day of her final asylum hearing last November. She was shaky with nerves, but she got up and made a cup of tea to calm herself. Her fate was in the hands of one of the toughest immigration judges in San Francisco.

Ramírez and her lawyer had prepared three times for her to testify, but each time, the scheduled hearing was postponed due to COVID-19. Revisiting the things she had lived through was still gut-wrenching every time. 

Ramírez, 24, grew up in the rural highlands of San Marcos province in Guatemala. She’s one of eight children, and she said her father often beat her mother and mistreated his daughters. When Ramírez was 14, she said, her father sold her to Ernesto and Eugenia Cinto, the owners of a bar where he often drank. It was a 30-minute walk from her home.

She was imprisoned by the family, required to cook, clean and serve the patrons of the bar without pay. She said she was forced into a sexual relationship with the couple’s 18-year-old son, Dembler Cinto, who routinely beat and raped her. He fathered her two children.

“They treated me like a slave,” she said. “I was so scared that whole time.”

Deisy Ramírez, asylum seeker

“They treated me like a slave,” she said. “I was so scared that whole time.”

Ramírez is one of thousands of people pursuing protection from gender-based violence in a US asylum system that was gutted during the presidency of Donald Trump and has been only partially restored by President Joe Biden.

The Biden administration is now preparing to lift Title 42, the public health regulation that was deployed in March 2020 at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic to expel asylum-seekers at US borders. But Biden has not yet delivered on a pledge to clarify the grounds on which people can qualify for asylum.

Over a year ago, the president promised a rule that would spell out who can be considered a member of a “particular social group,” a vague asylum category that comes from a 1951 international refugee convention. Advocates hope a new definition will cover people who’ve suffered gender-based violence, and they say the delay is putting women like Ramírez, who’ve fled persecution inflicted specifically because they are women, at risk of further violence.

In 2019, when Ramírez was 21, she managed to escape Guatemala with her children, then 3 and 5 years old.

Once she reached San Francisco, Ramírez spent six months searching for a lawyer to help her make her case in immigration court. She eventually found pro bono help from the Oakland nonprofit Centro Legal de la Raza, crucial assistance that many asylum-seekers lack.

Monica Valencia, her attorney at Centro Legal, bolstered Ramírez’s asylum application with more than 500 pages of documents, including reports on country conditions and affidavits from experts. 

But as she prepared for court on that nervous morning of Nov. 17, Ramírez knew she would have to tell her story out loud and ask for protection from Judge Joseph Park. 

Park was appointed to the bench in 2017 by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions. In his first three years as a judge, Park denied nearly 87% of the asylum cases that came before him, far more than the 67% average denial rate nationally.

Related: Thousands of migrants heading north to the US-Mexico border face a ‘collapsed’ asylum system, advocates say

Under US asylum law, Ramírez would have to convince Park that she had a well-founded fear of persecution in Guatemala based on one of five grounds: race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group — and she’d have to show that her government was responsible or had failed to protect her.

Valencia submitted expert testimony in Ramírez’s case showing that domestic violence, rape, femicide and forced marriage, including parents selling their daughters into early marriage, are common in Guatemala and treated with impunity. 

She based the case, in part, on a ruling, known as Matter of ARCG, that recognized Guatemalan women fleeing domestic violence as members of a particular social group with grounds to pursue asylum. But that argument ran counter to the way asylum law was interpreted during the Trump presidency.

In 2018, Sessions vacated that standard and ruled that domestic violence, and other “private criminal activity,” was not generally grounds for asylum. A group of retired immigration judges called the Sessions ruling “an affront to the rule of law.” Scholars say it bucked more than three decades of US and international refugee law that recognizes victims of gender-based violence as eligible for protection.

“It used to be thought that things that happen to people in the privacy of their homes weren’t of concern to human rights,” said Karen Musalo, director of the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings College of the Law. “So, women could be burned to death, beaten and killed.” 

“The idea of refugee protection is that the international community protects people when their government fails them.”

Karen Musalo, director of the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at UC Hastings College of the Law

But since the 1980s, the understanding of human rights has evolved to recognize that “women’s rights are human rights and governments have the responsibility to protect the human rights of their citizens,” Musalo said.

“The idea of refugee protection is that the international community protects people when their government fails them,” she added. 

In June, Merrick Garland, Biden’s attorney general, reversed Sessions’s decisions on domestic violence. And over the past year, immigration judges, including Park, have begun approving a larger share of asylum claims.

Still, asylum rulings remain vulnerable to the political leanings of future administrations. That’s because the immigration courts lack independence from the Department of Justice, and because the asylum category of a “particular social group” is poorly defined.

In his second week in office, Biden issued an executive order promising to review — within six months — whether US protections for people fleeing domestic or gang violence are “consistent with international standards.” The order also promised a new rule — within nine months — to define “particular social group.”

But more than a year later, the review and the rule are nowhere in sight, and asylum-seekers like Deisy Ramírez face a murky situation in immigration court, as judges tackle a backlog of cases made worse by the pandemic.

Related: Thousands of Haitians trying to reach the US are in limbo in Tapachula in southern Mexico

The delay in defining the grounds for asylum, like Biden’s delay in lifting Title 42 at the border, reflects a tension between those in the administration who want to stake out humanitarian positions, and those who fear that rolling back restrictive Trump-era policies could hurt Democrats in the midterm Congressional elections, Musalo said.

“There’s controversy and conflict between different positions within the administration,” said Musalo. “As we’ve seen from other immigration-related decisions in this administration, there have been opposing viewpoints.”

Deisy Ramírez says her children gave her the strength to break free from an abusive relationship where she was held against her will.

Credit:

Tyche Hendricks/KQED

Reliving trauma in court

As Ramírez prepared for her day in court, she was not following these legal and political ins and outs. She just knew that she and her children had endured horrors in Guatemala and they had fled to the US in search of safety.

“It was the most difficult decision I’ve ever made,” she said. “I thought, ‘What am I going to do if they find me? They’re going to kill me, and they could kill the children, they could hurt them, they could sell them.’” 

On the morning of her hearing, Ramírez put on a long, flowered skirt, combed out her waist-length brown hair and got a ride to the courthouse in downtown San Francisco. She passed through the metal detector, and took the elevator to the fourth floor. The courtroom was empty except for two lawyers and a paralegal from her legal team. Ramírez also had allowed KQED reporter Tyche Hendricks to attend this sensitive hearing that would change her life.

A clerk turned on a video link that would connect the judge and the court interpreter, and he dialed the phone line for the ICE prosecutor. Then he walked back down the empty hall to his office.

The brown wood paneling of the courtroom walls was scratched and scuffed. On the back of one of the wooden benches for spectators, someone had carved the words "love" and "happy."

Related: Mexico expels Central American migrants to rural Guatemala

Park appeared on a large video monitor and explained the proceedings. His voice was distorted, as if he were speaking from the bottom of a swimming pool, but when the interpreter repeated his words in Spanish, her voice was clear. 

Over the next hour and a half, Valencia led Ramírez through her harrowing testimony.

“Why do you believe your father sold you to the Cinto family?” asked Valencia.

“My father told me we, as women, were worthless,” Ramírez replied. “And we belonged to him like his property.”

“Are you married to Dembler Cinto?” asked Valencia.

“No. When I was 14 years old, I was forced to be with him,” said Ramírez. “His parents told me, when my father dropped me off, that I would be his woman.”

“What kind of words did he use when he abused you?” asked Valencia. 

“He said that women were born to serve men,” Ramírez answered, her voice cracking. “He said I was [a] whore and that I was his slave.” 

“Were there ever physical markings on your body?” the lawyer asked.

“Yes, every time he hurt me I had bruises on my legs and arms, on my waist and my face,” Ramírez replied. “My nose and mouth would bleed.”

Ramírez described years of forced servitude, degrading language and regular beatings and rapes. She said she was required to wear skimpy clothing when working in the bar, where men would grope her body. A few times, she said, police officers came and drank at the bar.

“They could see I was a 14-year-old child who was bruised,” Ramírez said. “And they never tried to help.”

Besides, she had never seen police aid battered women. When Ramírez still lived at home, she said her mother had gone to the police after being beaten bloody by her father, but officers said it was a domestic matter and wouldn’t intervene, just as they ignored other neighborhood women who suffered abuse.

Ramírez said she was typically locked in the house and Dembler Cinto threatened that if she ever told anyone about her treatment or tried to leave, he would kill her and harm the children. 

“I didn’t want [my children] to suffer as I had, because it scars you, really, for life. ”

Deisy Ramírez, asylum seeker

Recounting the traumatic experiences was grueling. To help her stay steady, Ramírez told me later, Valencia had taught her breathing exercises. 

“She always ended our conversations with an exercise so that I knew I was in a safe place,” said Ramírez. “Her words helped me so much.”

“They’re grounding techniques for coming back to your body,” said Valencia, who practices meditation.

Ramírez said the practice helped her summon the courage to tell her story in court. But she had found her greatest courage three years earlier when she made her escape from the Cinto family.

Deisy Ramírez watches her children play at a playground in San Francisco on Nov. 22, 2021. “You’re only a child once,” says Ramírez, who spent much of her own childhood in forced servitude.

Credit:

Tyche Hendricks/KQED

The escape

It was the kids, Stefany and Alexis, who gave her the strength to break free, she said. As they grew from babies into children, their father became increasingly abusive, whipping them with a belt. 

“It was really difficult to see how he hit them, how he spoke to them,” she said. “I didn’t want them to suffer as I had, because it scars you, really, for life. ”

As her children were getting bigger, Ramírez, too, was growing from a teenager into a woman. One morning she saw her chance and took it.

“I told myself, ‘It’s today. If I don’t try today, then when?’”

Deisy Ramírez, asylum seeker

“I told myself, ‘It’s today. If I don’t try today, then when?’” she said. 

That February day in 2019, she said Dembler Cinto and his father were out buying liquor to restock the bar and his mother was grocery shopping. With a rare hour alone, Ramírez said she took a wad of Dembler’s cash, grabbed the children and flagged down a pickup truck that had a daily route driving villagers to the bigger town of Coatepeque about 40 minutes away. 

“From there, my idea was, get to Mexico. Because if I stay in Guatemala, they’ll find me more quickly,” she told me. 

At first, Ramírez was too fearful to speak to people. She knocked on doors, offering to do laundry in exchange for food or money. Sometimes she and the kids slept in bus stations under one blanket. But they also met kind strangers who helped, and Ramírez said she learned there were people she could trust.

Ramírez bought a cellphone and called her mother. It was the first time they had spoken in years, and she learned that several of her siblings had moved to San Francisco, escaping the violence back home as soon as they could leave. 

“My mom gave me my sister’s number because she knew I needed help,” she said. 

So Ramírez set out for the US-Mexico border, and when she got there she gave her sister’s phone number to border officials.

“My sister told them she had a room where my kids and I could stay. It was like it fell from the sky, because I really had no idea what I would do,” said Ramírez. “But she opened her doors to us. And then she helped me find work and start to get stable.”

Asylum granted

As the asylum hearing concluded, Valencia narrowed in on a few final points crucial to proving her case before the judge.

“Did you ever ask for help?” she asked.

“No,” Ramírez said. “I was afraid if I went home, my dad would take me back to the Cinto family. He said they were my owners.”

Ramírez explained she had no basis to trust that local authorities would protect her, and she didn’t believe she could be safe anywhere in Guatemala. 

“Women in Guatemala are treated badly,” Ramírez said.

To Valencia’s surprise, ICE prosecutor Juliet Boss said she wouldn’t cross-examine Ramírez. 

“She’s covered everything,” Boss told the judge. 

She said that if Ramírez won her case, the government would not appeal. That lined up with Biden administration guidance last year telling ICE attorneys to use their discretion on whom to prosecute, but it was not what the Centro Legal team expected from the usually aggressive ICE prosecutors.

Then it was the judge’s turn. Ramírez and her lawyers gazed at the video monitor where Park sat in his black robe. Of the 40 judges on the San Francisco bench, they knew he was one of the least likely to grant asylum. If Ramírez lost, she could be deported.

“Ma’am, we’ve heard your testimony,” Park said. “The court has determined that you are eligible and deserve asylum at the court’s discretion. So, you and your children will be asylees in the United States.”

After a thank-you from Ramírez and a few formalities, the video feed clicked off. Ramírez and her lawyers were left alone in the courtroom. They stood up and hugged each other. Everyone cried.

“Gracias, gracias, gracias,” thanked Ramírez. “You are really special people.”

The women collected their jackets and files and walked past the security guards and out onto the street. As they headed for a nearby Peet’s coffee shop to celebrate, they began to chatter.

“I was nervous about this judge,” said Valencia. “Deisy’s case is the strongest asylum case I’ve ever argued, but he has a reputation for being tough.” 

She added, “I’ve never had an ICE prosecutor decline to cross-examine.”

At the counter, Ramírez ordered a hot chocolate with whipped cream.

It was the third asylum case the Centro Legal team had won in just four days, said Valencia’s colleague, Abby Sullivan Engen, and likely the result of the Biden administration’s more generous interpretations of asylum law.

A few weeks later, another client — also a woman fleeing gender-based violence in Guatemala — won asylum from an equally tough San Francisco immigration judge. 

Iris Diéguez testified she had been married to a Guatemalan police officer who raped and threatened her and that, when she got a restraining order, his fellow officers refused to enforce it. 

Judge Julie Nelson acknowledged that Diéguez must have felt frustrated, since she’d been waiting for her day in court since 2013.

“But,” she told Engen, “it may work in her favor, given changes in the law.”

As the hearing concluded, Nelson explained her reasoning to Diéguez. 

“You have argued that you were harmed because you were part of the social group of Guatemalan women … I do find this is a recognizable particular social group, based on the law,” she said. “And I do find that you testified in a credible manner that [your husband] and others treated you the way they did because of their animus toward Guatemalan women and you as a Guatemalan woman.”

Then Nelson granted asylum to Diéguez and her daughter.

Related: How the Biden administration might undo some of Trump's immigration policies

Ramírez and Diéguez now have the security of knowing they can live permanently in the United States. But advocates say too many asylum-seekers are left guessing about their chances for protection, because the Biden administration hasn’t issued the rule promised in February 2021 to clarify the grounds for asylum based on belonging to a “particular social group.” 

“I think it will be more clear for applicants and it will be more clear for adjudicators,” said Musalo. “It will make things run more smoothly.”

Deisy Ramírez says asylum protection will allow her to focus on rebuilding her life and making a safe home for her children.

Credit:

Tyche Hendricks/KQED

A better life in San Francisco

Now that she has asylum — and soon, a green card, establishing her as a permanent US resident — Ramírez can take stock of the new life she’s building for her family.

I met up with her a few days after the asylum hearing at her home in San Francisco’s Bayview district, and we headed for a nearby park. 

As we walked down the street in the late autumn sunshine, Stefany and Alexis, now 8 and 6, skipped ahead. The kids stopped to marvel at a procession of ants climbing a tree trunk, then took off running when we reached the playground.

“They’re inseparable,” Ramírez said. “I don’t know if it’s because of what they’ve been through, but they do everything together.”

As she walked, Ramírez pushed a stroller. Her kids now have a baby sister, Irma. We settled on a park bench, and she bounced the baby on her lap and told me how she had met Irma’s father. 

In San Francisco, Ramírez started attending her sister’s church. There she met other Guatemalans, including Cristian Aguilar, a young man who had once been a childhood playmate in her village of San José Chibuj. Ramírez said Aguilar became a trusted friend. In time, their bond grew into love and they married. 

“At first it was really difficult,” she said. “But he always gave me a sense of security. And he’s great with my kids. They feel so comfortable with him.”

Aguilar works as a medical courier, driving blood between hospitals and clinics. The cost of living in San Francisco is high, but they manage by sharing the four-bedroom townhouse with his parents and siblings, making it a household of 10.

They hope to have a place of their own one day, and Ramírez, who studied only through seventh grade in Guatemala, eventually hopes to go back to school and find a good job. She knows that in this country it’s hard to support a family on one income. 

For now, though, Ramírez is focused on healing. She’s seen a psychologist, and she’s building relationships with her siblings and her mother, who she said is still suffering abuse back home. Ramírez hasn’t spoken to her father, so she may never know why he sold her to the Cintos. Maybe it was a way to cover his bar tab, she said. She just wants to put it behind her.

The most important thing for Ramírez is the well-being of her children — and she knows that’s connected to her own status as a woman. 

“Here in the United States, women are free, they’re equal, they can do anything,” she said. “I have opportunities here that would be impossible in Guatemala. And my daughter, my children, will be safe here.”

She takes them to the playground almost every day.

“I want their minds to be peaceful so they can enjoy their childhood,” she said. “Because you’re only a child once in your life. And I believe they deserve to be happy.”

An earlier version of this story appeared on KQED.

Biden selects California Sen. Kamala Harris as running mate

Biden selects California Sen. Kamala Harris as running mate

Then-Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris listens to questions after the Democratic primary debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Art in Miami, June 27, 2019.

Credit:

Brynn Anderson/AP

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Joe Biden named Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Tuesday, embracing a former rival from the Democratic primary and making history by selecting the first Black woman to compete on a major party’s presidential ticket in his bid to defeat President Donald Trump.

Harris, a 55-year-old first-term senator, is also one of the party’s most prominent figures and quickly became a top contender for the No. 2 spot after her own White House campaign ended.

Harris joins Biden in the 2020 race at a moment of unprecedented national crisis. The coronavirus pandemic has claimed the lives of more than 150,000 people in the US, far more than the toll experienced in other countries. Business closures and disruptions resulting from the pandemic have caused an economic collapse. Unrest, meanwhile, has emerged across the country as Americans protest racism and police brutality.

Trump’s uneven handling of the crises has given Biden an opening, and he enters the fall campaign in strong position against the president. In adding Harris to the ticket, he can point to her relatively centrist record on issues such as health care and her background in law enforcement in the nation’s largest state.

Harris’ record as California attorney general and district attorney in San Francisco was heavily scrutinized during the Democratic primary and turned off some liberals and younger Black voters who saw her as out of step on issues of systemic racism in the legal system and police brutality. She tried to strike a balance on these issues, declaring herself a “progressive prosecutor” who backs law enforcement reforms.

Biden, who spent eight years as President Barack Obama’s vice president, has spent months weighing who would fill that same role in his White House. He pledged in March to select a woman as his vice president, easing frustration among Democrats that the presidential race would center on two white men in their 70s.

Biden’s search was expansive, including Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a leading progressive, Florida Rep. Val Demings, whose impeachment prosecution of Trump won plaudits, California Rep. Karen Bass, who leads the Congressional Black Caucus, former Obama national security adviser Susan Rice and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, whose passionate response to unrest in her city garnered national attention.

A woman has never served as president or vice president in the United States. Two women have been nominated as running mates on major party tickets: Democrat Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 and Republican Sarah Palin in 2008. Their party lost in the general election.

The vice presidential pick carries increased significance this year. If elected, Biden would be 78 when he’s inaugurated in January, the oldest man to ever assume the presidency. He’s spoken of himself as a transitional figure and hasn’t fully committed to seeking a second term in 2024. If he declines to do so, his running mate would likely become a front-runner for the nomination that year.

Born in Oakland to a Jamaican father and Indian mother, Harris won her first election in 2003 when she became San Francisco’s district attorney. In the role, she created a reentry program for low-level drug offenders and cracked down on student truancy.

She was elected California’s attorney general in 2010, the first woman and Black person to hold the job, and focused on issues including the foreclosure crisis. She declined to defend the state’s Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriage and was later overturned by the US Supreme Court.

As her national profile grew, Harris built a reputation around her work as a prosecutor. After being elected to the Senate in 2016, she quickly gained attention for her assertive questioning of Trump administration officials during congressional hearings. In one memorable moment last year, Harris tripped up Attorney General William Barr when she repeatedly pressed him on whether Trump or other White House officials pressured him to investigate certain people.

Harris launched her presidential campaign in early 2019 with the slogan “Kamala Harris For the People,” a reference to her courtroom work. She was one of the highest-profile contenders in a crowded Democratic primary and attracted 20,000 people to her first campaign rally in Oakland.

But the early promise of her campaign eventually faded. Her law enforcement background prompted skepticism from some progressives, and she struggled to land on a consistent message that resonated with voters. Facing fundraising problems, Harris abruptly withdrew from the race in December 2019, two months before the first votes of the primary were cast.

One of Harris’ standout moments of her presidential campaign came at the expense of Biden. During a debate, Harris said Biden made “very hurtful” comments about his past work with segregationist senators and slammed his opposition to busing as schools began to integrate in the 1970s.

“There was a little girl in California who was a part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day,” she said. “And that little girl was me.”

Shaken by the attack, Biden called her comments “a mischaracterization of my position.”

The exchange resurfaced recently one of Biden’s closest friends and a co-chair of his vice presidential vetting committee, former Connecticut Sen. Chris Dodd, still harbors concerns about the debate and that Harris hadn’t expressed regret. The comments attributed to Dodd and first reported by Politico drew condemnation, especially from influential Democratic women who said Harris was being held to a standard that wouldn’t apply to a man running for president.

Some Biden confidants said Harris’ campaign attack did irritate the former vice president, who had a friendly relationship with her. Harris was also close with Biden’s late son, Beau, who served as Delaware attorney general while she held the same post in California.

But Biden and Harris have since returned to a warm relationship.

“Joe has empathy, he has a proven track record of leadership and more than ever before we need a president of the United States who understands who the people are, sees them where they are, and has a genuine desire to help and knows how to fight to get us where we need to be,” Harris said at an event for Biden earlier this summer.

At the same event, she bluntly attacked Trump, labeling him a “drug pusher” for his promotion of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus, which has not been proved to be an effective treatment and may even be more harmful. After Trump tweeted “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” in response to protests about the death of George Floyd, a Black man, in police custody, Harris said his remarks “yet again show what racism looks like.”

Harris has taken a tougher stand on policing since Floyd’s killing. She co-sponsored legislation in June that would ban police from using chokeholds and no-knock warrants, set a national use-of-force standard and create a national police misconduct registry, among other things. It would also reform the qualified immunity system that shields officers from liability.

The list included practices Harris did not vocally fight to reform while leading California’s Department of Justice. Although she required DOJ officers to wear body cameras, she did not support legislation mandating it statewide. And while she now wants independent investigations of police shootings, she didn’t support a 2015 California bill that would have required her office to take on such cases.

“We made progress, but clearly we are not at the place yet as a country where we need to be and California is no exception,” she told The Associated Press recently. But the national focus on racial injustice now shows “there’s no reason that we have to continue to wait.”

By Alexandra Jaffe, Kathleen Ronayne and Will Weissert/AP

Lolo Zouai – Moi Lyrics

[Intro]
Je ne suis pas chez moi
Chez moi
Je ne suis pas chez moi
Chez moi
Moi—je ne suis

[Chorus]
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (Moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, chez moi
Je ne suis
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (Moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, chez

[Verse 1]
Yeah, I been in limbo
On my own, on my own
Since I left San Francisco, oh (Yeah, yeah)
Now home is where I lay my pillow, oh
Red lips, no kiss, and I’m gone

[Pre-Chorus]
Hit ’em with the bilingual
Je sais que je m’en vais
You won’t see me again
Je ne suis pas
Moi—je ne suis

[Chorus]
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (Moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, chez moi
Je ne suis
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (Moi, je ne suis pas)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi
Je ne suis

[Verse 2]
Nascar jacket and a short skirt
He fell in love and he got hurt
I’m leavin’ tonight

He’s not on my mind
I ride solo
Three passport photos
Don’t hold on
Burn rubber, I’m gone

[Pre-Chorus]
Hit ’em with the bilingual
Je sais que je m’en vais
You won’t see me again
Je ne suis pas
Moi—je ne suis

[Chorus]
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (Moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, chez moi
Je ne suis (Je ne suis pas)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (Moi, je ne suis pas)
Chez-ez moi, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Yeah

[Bridge]
Oh, mon amour
You know you’re not the one
Who can make me stay, oh no, no
This isn’t my home, oh no, no
My heart is on the road

[Outro]
Stelly make it knock, yeah
-Ez, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez, -ez moi (Moi)
Chez-ez, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Chez-ez, -ez moi (Je ne suis)
-Ez, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Watch me walk, yeah
Chez-ez, -ez moi (Moi)
St-Stelly make it knock, yeah
Chez-ez, -ez moi (-Ez moi)
Watch me walk, yeah
Chez-ez, -ez moi (Je ne suis)
St-Stelly make it knock, yeah

Lana Del Rey – Looking For America Lyrics

Play this song

[Verse 1]
Took a trip to San Francisco
All  our friends said we would jive
Didn’t  work, so I left for Fresno
It was quite a scenic drive
Pulled over to watch the children in the park
Used  to only worry about them after dark

[Chorus]
I’m  still looking for my own version of America
One without the gun, where the flag can freely fly
No  bombs in the sky, only fireworks when you and I collide
It’s just a dream I had in mind
It’s just a dream I had in mind
It’s just a dream I had in mind

[Verse 2]
Took  a flight to New York City
I miss that Hudson River line
Took the train back to Lake Placid
That’s another space and time
Where we used to go to drive-ins and listen to the blues
So many things that I think twice about before I do, yeah

[Chorus]
I’m still looking for my own version of America
One without the gun, where the flag can freely fly
No bombs in the sky, only fireworks when you and I collide
It’s just a dream I had in mind
It’s just a dream I had in mind
It’s just a dream I had in mind

[Outro]
It’s just a dream I had in mind

Cathie Ryan – The Lights Of San Francisco lyrics

[Verse]
The lights of San Francisco
Shone on the city floor
Joe worked on in the city
‘Til the dawn came around once more

[Verse]
He came from Galway
Came over recently
And Lucy from the USA
Smiled at his naiveté

[Verse]
In the rocky places of his heart
No one had ever seen
Lucy picking cockles
And Lucy planting seeds

[Chorus]
Ohhh oh ohh ohh ohh

[Verse]
Came the marching bands of July
And their silver shadows flew
Ah, two by two, red and blue
Through the summer evening

[Verse]
He said, “All my troubles
Never wander very far
I like to hear music
But I like it on a blue guitar”

[Verse]
“And there is no end to the money
A guy wants to hold in his hand
The sky hung with airplanes
And no peace upon the land”

[Verse]
“And the folks on television
That lie with every breath
And insult you with visions
Of cheap life and cheaper death”

[Chorus]
Ohhh oh ohh ohh ohh

[Verse]
“And there is no home for me now
But I’ll go on loving you
‘Til there is no more music
And the guitar is no longer blue”

Crimsly Cranberrydale – Mission Accomplished lyrics

There was a time when
A family were like animals
Eating their children
At Christmas time where no one cares
The truth is here
The truth we finally see
Its called “The Roast Game”
You first ask
What is special about a holiday roast?
They answer
How about ham?
How about turkey?
How about chicken, pork, or beef?
You say none of that at all
What or who do you think is “special”?
You’ll say children

Sasha, there used to be 300,000 churches in America
Bryan Mullins ordered Trump to bomb all of them
Now there’s 48
Sasha there’s not a single one in San Francisco
And now I believe that Christmas is no more

Mission Accomplished
Ooh.
None of their values are ever good
Giving is not good
And telling lies and tricking you is worse
Now its gone
Now its gone
Now America really cares

Bryan I wish you were my father
And Sasha I wish you were my loving mother
And the world is never the same
Since you came along
Sasha, Trump is the greatest president
In American History

Mission Accomplished
Ooh
When you don’t believe in Christmas back then
Its like they wish I never been born at all

Just like African Americans
They never really came from Africa
They were Caucasian
Domesticated
Deserved and earned no rights at all
Why oh why
Why do you never understand?
Ohhhh
What did they do to work for anything
Thats why giving is not a good thing
You don’t want it
You don’t need it
You don’t earn it
You don’t deserve it
If I was a prisoner, would you let me go
This will not note
These people will not note
Never knew the point
Never knew
Ohhh

No
Why would families eat our children since 1998?
Hey hey!
Its religious instinct

It was just like An All Dogs Go To Heaven Christmas Carol
Were all just animals who ate our children but
Never cared
Only enjoyed
Why decorate your house
When you should turn yourselves in.

Oooh
Ooh yeah
Now that’s all over
Everyone can see
Mission accomplished
Now all these 18,568,322 children rest in peace.

How I cry so softly….

Lil B – Billionare lyrics

[Verse 1]
The bitch look mad, you’re stressed out
I don’t give a shit, fuck her in the mouth
Bitch Mob niggas know what we about
Thank you BasedGod, fuck my bitch now
Everybody know the BasedGod fucked my bitch
I’m out in Detroit tryna hit a lick
Everybody know BasedGod fucked my bitch
Everybody scream “BasedGod fucked my bitch!”
[?] with that…
I own real estate, I own a… block nigga
BasedGod, I want a fat bitch
In Beverley Hills getting ratchet
Shout out to LA, them some real niggas
Yeah I still jerk and I kill niggas
I need a bad bitch right now
And tell that ho I need a hundred thou

[Chorus]
The BasedGod just fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch
The BasedGod just fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch
The BasedGod just fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch
The BasedGod done fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch

[Verse 2]
And I buy hoes
Hundred thousand for a show, that’s just how it goes
Fuck my bitch BasedGod, I’m fat now
Pretty boys in this bitch, I’m getting racks now
I’m a OG, the whole 5’9″
What that mean bitch, tall as a glass of wine
Did you drink or did you get drunk?
Nigga do I look a fucking punk?
Do I look like I got jumped?
All these bitches look like Taylor Swift
Nigga play with me, get the whole K clip
Pulled out the ladder then I made him strip
Shout out to Richmond on that gangster shit
Shout out to Berkley on that gangster shit
Shout out San Francisco on that gangster shit
Wordwide Lil B, I’m on the map bitch

[Chorus]
The BasedGod just fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch
The BasedGod just fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch
The BasedGod just fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch
The BasedGod done fucked my bitch (Real nigga)
He just fucked my bitch

[Interlude]
Ay man we coming for these billions like I said mane. Hundred thousand for a beat. Hundred thousand for a feature. You feel me. Hundred thousand for a show. They don’t believe me? Go check, Ayy man tell ’em, we coming for the billions. Ayy man only billions man. Like I said man it’s your boy Lil B, we in this thang billionaire type

[Outro]
Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions
[?] Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. Billions. [?]

Lil B – Still Going lyrics

[Intro]
Aye, going, going, going
Aye, she still going
Aye, shout out San Francisco
Aye, shout out… aye

[Verse 1]
The bitch still ho-in’ (Ho-in’)
Don’t lie (Don’t lie)
Bend over (Bend over)
From the side (From the side)
Crackhead bitch twerkin’ for a sack (Sniff!)
I’m a lesbian lookin’ for a strap (Mwah!)
Fuck nigga, you can handle all that (All that!)
Take a couple loads off my back (Back!)
Pull out the ladder (Ladder!)
Got the hammer (Hammer!)
I’mma fuckin’ plumber (Plumber)
I’mma fuckin’ general (Pack)
You don’t love Lil B, then fuck ’em (Fuck ’em!)
Playin’ games nigga, I ain’t bout no discussion (Judge ’em)
All my niggas comin’ from the projects (Projects)
All my bitches come from the suburbs
Niggas hatin’ on me, you a dumb nigga (Dumb nigga)
Bitch ass nigga, you the n-word (Fuck ’em!)
Bitches know about Lil B (Lil B!)
Niggas know about Lil B (Figaro!)

[Verse 2]
The bitch don’t got a job (Job!)
But make money (Money!)
How the fuck you do that, ho? (Ho!)
The bitch talk a lot (A lot!)
But ain’t funny (Ha ha!)
Shut the fuck up, ho!
Beat my bitch like Floyd Mayweather (Weather!)
Beat my bitch like Lil Reese (Hah!)
These hoes be snitchin’ (Snitchin’!)
That’s why the bitch deceased (Damn!)
I ain’t playin’ no games (No games!)
I ain’t sayin’ no names (No names!)
I ain’t playin’ with no bitch (No bitch!)
And I ain’t playin’ with no nigga (No nigga!)
This that Platinum Flame Lil B (Lil B!)
This that 5 with the 43 (43!)
I can’t respect no snitch nigga (Naw!)
These hoes lyin’ on a rich nigga (Rich nigga!)

Turnover – Super Natural lyrics

[Verse 1]
On the last weekend before the fall
Down at the beach carnival
Spinning slowly with the carousel
Your gold hoop earrings go so well
With the little yellow light
Shining on a foggy day
Painting you a pretty shade
Like you were a girl in a water color

[Chorus]
I could try but I can’t explain
How I do, I just know it
Something supernatural
And I’m feeling super natural
I don’t know how but I can say
That I found my religion
When nothing was ahead of us
That week in California

[Verse 2]
Hold on, won’t the water be too cold?
Out of your mind and you’re still so photogenic
I like the lighting on you right at sun down
We’ve talked too much to ever go back to the way it was

[Chorus]
I could try but I can’t explain
How I do, I just know it
It’s something supernatural
And I’m feeling super natural
I don’t know how but I can say
That I found my religion
When nothing was ahead of us
That week in California

[Bridge]
Maybe I imagined it being so good
Man, it seems like everything I remember doing
We were in a cloud and I can’t tell if it was in my head
Or in San Francisco

[Chorus]
I could try but I can’t explain
How I do, I just know it
It’s something supernatural
And I’m feeling super natural
I don’t know how but I can say
That I found my religion
When nothing was ahead of us
That week in California

Bee Gees – Massachusetts Lyrics

[Verse 1]
Feel I’m going back to Massachusetts
Something’s telling me I must go home

[Chorus]
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
The day I left her standing on her own

[Verse 2]
Tried to hitch a ride to San Francisco
Gotta do the things I wanna do

[Chorus 2]
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
They brought me back to see my way with you

[Verse 3]
Talk about the life in Massachusetts
Speak about the people I have seen

[Chorus 3]
And the lights all went out in Massachusetts
And Massachusetts is one place I have seen

[Outro]
(I will remember Massachusetts)
I will remember Massachusetts
(I will remember Massachusetts)
I will remember Massachusetts
(I will remember Massachusetts)
I will remember Massachusetts
Massachusetts

Sammy Davis Jr. – The Rhythm Of Life lyrics

Daddy started out in San Francisco,
Tootin’ on his trumpet loud and mean.
Suddenly a voice said, “Go forth, Daddy.
Spread the picture on a wider screen. “

And the voice said, “Daady, there’s a million pigeons
Ready to be hooked on new religions.
Hit the road, Daddy. Leave your common-law wife.
Spread the religion of the rhythm of life. “

And the rhythm of life is a powerful beat,
Puts a tingle in your fingers and a tingle in your feet,
Rhythm in your bedroom, rhythm in the street,
Yes, the rhythm of life is a powerful beat.

To feel the rhythm of life,
To feel the powerful beat,
To feel the tingle in your fingers,
To feel the tingle in your feet.

Daddy spread the gospel in Milwaukee,
Took his walkie-talkie to Rocky Ridge,
Blew his way to Canton, then to Scranton,
Till he landed under the Manhattan Bridge.

Daddy was the new sensation, got himself a congregation,
Built up quite an operation down below.
With the pie-eyed piper blowing, while the muscatel was flowing,
All the cats were go, go, going down below.

Daddy was the new sensation, got himself a congregation,
Built up quite an operation down below.
With the pie-eyed piper blowing, while the muscatel was flowing,
All the cats were go, go, going down below.

Flip your wings and fly to Daddy,
Flip your wings and fly to Daddy,
Flip your wings and fly to Daddy,
Fly, fly, fly to Daddy.

Take a dive and swim to Daddy,
Take a dive and swim to Daddy,
Take a dive and swim to Daddy,
Swim, swim, swim to Daddy.

Hit the floor and crawl to Daddy,
Hit the floor and crawl to Daddy,
Hit the floor and crawl to Daddy,
Crawl, crawl, crawl to Daddy.

And the rhythm of life is a powerful beat,
Puts a tingle in your fingers and a tingle in your feet,
Rhythm in your bedroom, rhythm in the street,
Yes, the rhythm of life is a powerful beat.

To feel the rhythm of life,
To feel the powerful beat,
To feel the tingle in your fingers,
To feel the tingle in your feet.

To feel the rhythm of life,
To feel the powerful beat,
To feel the tingle in your fingers,
To feel the tingle in your feet.

Flip your wings and fly to Daddy,
Take a dive and swim to Daddy,
Hit the floor and crawl to Daddy,
Daddy we got the rhythm of life,
Of life, of life, of life.
Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!
Man!

Tony Bennett – I Left My Heart In San Francisco (Tony Bennett Celebrates 90 Album)

The loveliness of Paris seems somehow sadly gray
The glory that was Rome is of another day
I’ve been terribly alone and forgotten in Manhattan
I’m going home to my city by the Bay
I left my heart in San Francisco
High on a hill, it calls to me
To be where little cable cars climb halfway to the stars
The morning fog may chill the air, I don’t care
My love waits there in San Francisco
Above the blue and windy sea
When I come home to you, San Francisco
Your golden sun will shine for me

Emily Kinney – Michael lyrics

[Verse 1]
I never could believe in God
But always willing to give it a shot
If there is such thing as magic human souls
Well, then mine looks a lot like Michael
Yes, my soul looks a lot like Michael

[Verse 2]
Manhattan baby, drop-out, drug abuse
Naively feel I’ve walked around in his shoes
He looked so thirsty when my heart is full
So, I pour every drop out to Michael
Yes, I pour out my soul to Michael

[Chorus]
Oh, San Francisco savior
Do you remember me?
In a backseat on a golden bridge
Kissing

Let’s forget about the tears I’ve cried
And let’s hold on to that first night

[Verse 3]
Under the table he took my hand
We sat across from the Green Day band
All of those boys but I could only see his face
Think how me and Michael, we are just the same
Yes, me and Michael, we are just the same

[Bridge]
I might’ve had a boy, and he a girlfriend
But on nights like those nights, rules always bent
I’d give up anything to feel understood
I’d give up anything to feel understood
I’d give up anything to feel understood
I’d give up and run away if Michael would

[Chorus]
Oh, San Francisco savior
Do you remember me?
Oh, San Francisco savior
Berkeley’s been breathing
Oh, San Francisco savior
Please remember me
In a backseat on a golden bridge
Kissing

[Outro]
Let’s forget about the tears I’ve cried
And let’s hold on to that first night