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Safe and unsilenced: Afghan scholars find a refuge in US universities

“MuiTypography-root-229 MuiTypography-h1-234″>Safe and unsilenced: Afghan scholars find a refuge in US universitiesThe WorldSeptember 30, 2022 · 12:45 PM EDT

Masuma Mohammadi sits on a bench at San José State University, where she's been hired to research Afghanistan from a safe distance. 

Courtesy of Sara Arman

Masuma Mohammadi was a radio reporter for the United Nations News service for a popular news program in Afghanistan called “Hello Countrymen, Countrywomen,” before the Taliban took over the country in August of 2021.

Her work as a journalist and women’s rights activist made her a target for the Taliban. She was forced to flee and found refuge in the US, a country she had visited only once, years ago.

Mohammadi has been in San Jose, California, with a residency at San Jose State University, for six months now. Her research detailing the persecution of the ethnic Hazara in Afghanistan is work she could never do in her home country.

“Afghan women have been completely removed from the structure of [public] life in Afghanistan,” Mohammadi said, adding that the country is experiencing a profound human rights and humanitarian crisis.

Girls aren’t allowed to attend high school, women are barred from working in offices and nongovernmental organizations, and they’re not allowed to travel or go long distances without a male chaperone.

But through the power of the internet, she and other Afghans like her — journalists, activists and academics — are able to continue their research outside of Afghanistan in the US, thanks to the Afghan Visiting Scholars program, a collaboration between some Bay Area universities.

The program is the brainchild of Halima Kazem-Stojanovic, who was a refugee herself more than 40 years ago when Afghanistan fell to the former Soviet Union.

“My family came as Afghan political refugees in what I call the first migration of Afghans into the United States,” Kazem-Stojanovic said. “My parents knew other Afghan families who lived in San Jose including [the famous author] Khalid Husseini's parents. Our fathers were friends.”

The family settled in San Jose just before she started kindergarten.

Kazem-Stojanovic is now an oral historian on Afghanistan at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, but for 10 years, she was a journalism and human rights professor at San Jose State — and a core faculty member of its Human Rights Institute.

Because her work has often taken her to Afghanistan, she has many connections there.

“This has meant incredible opportunities to make very close friendships in Afghanistan. I trained more than 300 journalists in the last 20 years in Afghanistan,” she said. “Many became wonderful friends, and that's a very dear title we have among Afghans, when you're considered a cousin, even though you're not by blood.”

As Kabul fell to the Taliban, she received hundreds of messages on her WhatsApp and Signal accounts, like: “How do we get out of here?” “Can you send money?” “I can't go home.”

Kazem-Stojanovic said most of the people she was in contact with are in hiding. One photographer she knew dug a hole in his yard to bury his awards, including his Pulitzer Prize.

She reached out to her network in the US to help Afghan academics and journalists get out of the country — but also, to support people once they arrived here.

As the child of an economics professor who couldn’t teach in the United States, Kazem-Stojanovic was keenly aware that these refugees would need financial and professional support to establish themselves on this side of the Pacific.

“I thought, possibly, I could give some — a few — an opportunity not only to come here, but continue their public-facing work,” Kazem-Stojanovic said.

She found ready collaborators at the University of California, Berkeley’s Human Rights Center and her own San José State University. And so began the Afghan Visiting Scholars program.

“Together, we quickly rolled out a crowdfunding campaign [now ended] because universities work very slowly, the wheels don't turn very fast and we were in an emergency.

“We were in a crisis,” Kazem-Stojanovic said ruefully. “I think we raised over $300,000. And that was the easy part because then it was, all right, well, how do we get people here?”

She added, “We thought that if we could reach out to members of Congress and senators with lists of people … but they couldn't do very much. The evacuation lists were so long. There were so few places.”

The list of schools that have taken on more Afghan scholars, and participated in the work involved to apply for J-1 academic visas and J-2 visas (for immediate family members), is small but growing; including the University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as Yale University, Tennessee State University and The University of Texas at El Paso. 

‘Room and space for Afghans to do the work’

One year later, Kazem-Stojanovic maintains a list of roughly 130 people waiting for academic visas, many of them in Pakistan, India and Turkey. Others are already in the US on humanitarian parole, which allows them to stay for two years.

People get on the list in a variety of ways — starting with an application process.

“Placing the applicant depends on where they are geographically, the field they are in, and a variety of immigration factors,” she said. “We have various routes for bringing scholars here. We have to be creative because each person has a unique situation.”

So far, she has found placements for 15 Afghan scholars.

In addition to helping bring Afghans to safety, she said, the program is an avenue for illuminating stories that are often untold in the West.

“There's still so much need to understand this country [Afghanistan] and this part of the world. And I would like to see native Afghans contribute to that,” Kazem-Stojanovic said. “So much of what's published in the West is by non-Afghans. You know, a lot of American and European anthropologists and historians. And there's room and space now for Afghans to do the work.”

The Afghan Visiting Scholars program isn’t the only one of its kind. Stanford University is working with New York-based Scholars at Risk and the New University in Exile Consortium boasts nearly 60 universities around the world that agreed to host displaced scholars from countries where their lives were in danger.

According to the International Refugee Assistance Project, an estimated 83,000 Afghans were evacuated to the United States, and about 76,000 of them do not have access to a pathway to permanent legal status. The Afghan Adjustment Act, now pending on Capitol Hill, would allow them to apply for permanent legal residency, as happened for Vietnamese after the Vietnam War, and Kurds after the Iraq War.

“Pass the Afghan Adjustment Act,” Kazem-Stojanovic said. “The people who are here have gone through so much. They need peace of mind. They need to know that their lives are secure in the future and they will be wonderful, incredible assets to this country.” 
 

Expanding possibilities in the US

Faisal Karimi is another Afghan who has benefited from the Afghan Visiting Scholars Program.

After 20 years as a journalist, academic and women’s rights activist, Karimi’s life was turned upside-down last year. The assistant professor of journalism and communications at Herat University in western Afghanistan had to flee along with his wife and children.

“I produced dozens of stories about Taliban policy and ideology. My life, my family was in danger … We received many calls, threats and messages from the Taliban.”

Karimi destroyed his SIM card to obscure his movements, but managed to get in touch with nongovernmental organizations that had worked with him in the past, to evacuate his colleagues, as well as himself, within 10 days of the collapse of Herat to the Taliban.

The 22-hour public bus trip to Kabul over bombed-out roads was harrowing, as was the refugee camp his family lived in for seven months in Albania, but so was the prospect of starting from scratch in a strange land he’d visited once in 2013.

“I never [thought] that I’d come back again forever, to be a San Josean.”

So many refugees evacuated to the US and other countries wind up doing poorly paid or physically demanding jobs in health care, meatpacking and restaurants.

At an American university, Karimi is able to continue to make use of his intelligence and education, not to mention his English-language skills. Today, he’s a visiting research scholar at San Jose State, studying the Taliban and publishing news stories from the US.

“From here, we’re covering women’s challenges in Afghanistan, women's protests,” he said. “The local media, they’re not allowed to.”

Karimi hopes to pursue a doctorate degree in communications here, and then a career as a journalism professor.

“California and the United States is my second home. I really appreciate America’s people: their support, their kindness, everything they’ve provided for me and my family to stay in the United States.”

For Mohammadi, too, the chance to keep working is important. Although she's still learning to navigate an entirely new system and culture, she said that she is grateful to be in a position to make a positive difference in her home country from the relative safety of San Jose. And, it’s work that would be hard for a non-Hazaras, she said.

“We don’t hear stories from people, stories from victims, what situation they are living under, what’s their problems, what’s their request from the US, from the international community. In this way, we raise their voices,” Mohammadi said. 

An earlier version of this story was published by KQED.

 

The Foreign Ministry said that the emergency at Nord Stream occurred in the US intelligence zone

Russian Foreign Ministry: Nord Stream accidents occurred in the US intelligence zone Maria Zakharova explained that the accidents occurred in the exclusive economic zones of Denmark and Sweden, and these are “NATO-centric countries” that are completely under the control of US intelligence

Accidents at the Nord Stream gas pipelines and Nord Stream 2 took place in a zone controlled by American special services, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said on the air of Solovyov.Live.

“[Sweden and Denmark, whose special economic zones have been leaked]— these are the most NATO-centric countries. These are the countries that are stuffed with American weapons, these are the very countries that are completely controlled by the American special services, are absolutely and definitely under the control of the special services of the United States of America, which are completely— I emphasize, completely— control the situation there, — she is convinced.

In response to Vladimir Solovyov’s question about whether Moscow was ready to blame the United States for what had happened, Zakharova said: “Here we are not talking about readiness, here we are talking about the beginning of a big job.”

The incident, which became known on September 26, resulted in at least four leaks on both pipes. The Kremlin has not previously ruled out that sabotage could lead to accidents. Seismologists in Denmark and Sweden, in whose exclusive economic zones damage was recorded, reported powerful explosions in the area of ​​the incident.

The Russian Embassy in the United States stated the need for a thorough and objective investigation of the accidents and noted that the destruction of Russian gas pipelines is beneficial for Washington. The diplomatic mission also recalled the American warships that were at the site of damage to Russian infrastructure the day before the incident, and the promise of United States President Joe Biden to “put an end” to Nord Stream 2 in case of “invasion” Russia to Ukraine.

The words of the American leader were also recalled by the representative of the President of Russia Dmitry Peskov. After that, the White House clarified that Biden promised not to destroy Nord Stream 2, but only to prevent its commissioning. Zakharova found this indication unconvincing: in her opinion, in the words of the representatives of the American administration, “there was a clear threat from official Washington, including one reinforced by the president's statement about the termination of this project.”

Read on RBC Pro Pro Forward to the USSR: Soviet skills that will be useful in work and life on partial mobilization: what should an investor do? Articles Pro Russian brands from mini-shops: who now sells on Ozon and Wildberries Articles Pro First after Musk. The secret story of the Indian rich man who overtook Bezos Articles

Former Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski posted a photo from the scene on Twitter after the accident on gas pipelines and wrote: “Thank you, USA.” Zakharova, in response, asked if these words could be interpreted as an official statement about a terrorist attack.

After the emergency, the German publication Spiegel reported, citing sources, that a few weeks earlier, the US CIA had warned Berlin about potential attacks on gas pipelines in the Baltic sea.

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No contradiction in supporting protesters while pursuing nuclear deal with Iran, US special envoy says

“MuiTypography-root-134 MuiTypography-h1-139″>No contradiction in supporting protesters while pursuing nuclear deal with Iran, US special envoy says

Robert Malley, the US special envoy for Iran, joined The World's host Marco Werman from Washington to discuss how the Biden administration views the current protests and what this could all mean for efforts to secure a nuclear deal with Iran.

The WorldSeptember 28, 2022 · 5:15 PM EDT

In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Ebrahim Raisi speaks during his press conference in Tehran, Iran, Monday, Aug. 29, 2022. Raisi warned that any roadmap to restore Tehran's tattered nuclear deal with world powers must see international inspectors end their probe on man-made uranium particles found at undeclared sites in the country. 

Iranian Presidency Office/AP

Protests in Iran show no signs of letting up. Yesterday, riot police clashed with demonstrators in dozens of cities across the country. Today, students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences chanted slogans.

They were condemning police brutality and calling for more freedom for Iranian women. The demonstrations come after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who was accused of violating the law on headscarves. Amini died in police custody.

Robert Malley, the US special envoy for Iran, joined The World's host Marco Werman from Washington to discuss how the Biden administration views the protests and what this could all mean for efforts to secure a nuclear deal with Iran. 

Marco Werman: Rob Malley, what's going through your mind as you watched day after day these protests in Iran? Are they a game-changer for the country?Robert Malley: We've all watched, sort of transfixed at the sight of brave Iranian women and men protesting. And what we do know is what we're going to do. We're going to speak forcefully about the fundamental rights of the Iranian people as we want to do across the world. We're going to condemn and sanction those Iranian institutions that were responsible for the death of Mahsa Amini. We've already sanctioned Iran's morality police and finally, and importantly, we're going to continue to help the Iranian people find ways to exercise their right to access information in the face of Iranian government attempts to block their access to the internet. We've taken steps already by loosening our sanctions in a way that would allow Iranians to talk to each other, communicate with each other and with the outside world.Well, as you say, as Iran has gone to shutting down the Internet quite forcefully, the US in response, has been trying to get communications equipment into the hands of demonstrators. Has that been successful?So what we really have done is try to open the door to US companies to allow them to provide tools to ordinary Iranians and allow them to overcome and circumvent the surveillance tools on censorship. We've seen that it's had some effect already, but of course, it's in the face of a widespread attempt by the Iranian government to block that communication.So in 2009, when there were widespread protests in Iran, culminating in that killing of a 26-year old Neda Agha-Soltan, the Obama White House did not want to support the protests, fearing charges of foreign interference. Now the US is engaged and supporting the protesters. What changed? I wasn't part of the Obama administration at the time. I think the Obama administration in due course, did condemn the repression. But listen, all I could speak about is what the Biden administration is about. And it's not about regime change. This is not a policy that is trying to fuel instability in Iran and try to topple the regime and the government. It's a policy that is trying to be true to US beliefs that people have the right to exercise fundamental freedoms.At the same time as these demonstrations are happening, there is the languishing Iran nuclear deal with discouraging levels of progress recently to revive the 2015 agreement. With that effort stalled. How has that changed the calculus with supporting these protests? In other words, how do you see the relationship between the protests and the nuclear talks?Some people have asked us why would we continue to pursue a nuclear deal in the face of the repression of this Iranian government. It didn't take what just happened, the tragedy that occurred to Mahsa Amini, for us to know what this Iranian government is about. The reason we're pursuing a nuclear deal is [that] we don't want this government to have its hands on a nuclear weapon. It's really as simple as that. And so that remains a fundamental national security interest of the United States. And, yes, we can do both things at the same time. We can be true to our values and speak out forcefully on behalf of ordinary Iranians who want to exercise their fundamental rights, even as we pursue another fundamental national security interest, which is to make sure that Iran doesn't acquire a nuclear weapon. And so those who say we shouldn't engage with them, we would ask the question, "What are we going to do to stop Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon?" Isn't diplomacy the best way, if we can do it? And by the way, we also have to engage with the Iranian government to secure the release of four of our citizens who have been unjustly detained, one of them for seven years. And to those who think that there's a contradiction, I would ask, what would they do to try to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon?A US diplomat told journalists this week that the negotiations on that nuclear deal with Iran have hit a wall. What is the wall? How do you see it? We were close to a deal, we thought about a month ago, and then Iran, for its own reasons and reasons that one should ask them, decided to reintroduce an issue that has nothing to do with the deal, which has to do with the International Atomic Energy Agency's investigation into past Iranian activities, and in particular, the presence of uranium particles on the site. So without getting into the details, what Iran has asked for is for us, the United States and European countries to put pressure on the international agency to conclude those investigations. That has nothing to do with the deal, number one, and number two, it's something that we won't do. It's a decision Iran has to make. So that's the wall we're facing right now. But it's a wall that only Iran could overcome. What we can do is continue to maintain our pressure to make sure that Iran doesn't acquire a nuclear weapon.As you pointed out, Rob, President Trump famously exited the Iran nuclear deal in 2018. One thing Iranian negotiators have said is that they want guarantees that the election of a new Republican president in 2024, if that happens, would not mean the US will back out of another nuclear deal. Do they have a point? I can understand why they would want that guarantee. We've told them from the minute these negotiations began over a year and a half ago, that's not the way our system works. If a future president decides again recklessly to unilaterally withdraw from the deal at a time that the deal was working, if that's what they decide to do, there's nothing we, as in Biden, can do to stop that.Rob, finally, is Iran intent on having nuclear weapons? I mean, is that what US policy assumes? Is that the underlying belief?Without getting into sort of what our intelligence community would say, I think at this point, it doesn't appear that Iran has made a decision to acquire a nuclear weapon. It doesn't mean that they're not expanding their program so that they could be on the threshold of doing so. But they do not appear today to have made that decision. Again, we can't build our policy on what we assess to be Iran's intent. We base our policy on what we see Iran is doing. And our policy is guided by the president's very firm commitment to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons through diplomacy, if that's at all possible.Rob, as you've served in this role as US special envoy for Iran, is there an anecdote you can share with us that kind of really sheds light on where things stand at this moment in time with Iran?You know, I don't think there's an anecdote that I would be prepared to recount at this point. I do think, though, that it is quite telling that we have been relatively close to a deal on more than one occasion, last spring and in August. And both times, Iran, for some reason and again, you should ask them and have their officials on your program, once, because they wanted us to commit to lifting the foreign terrorist organization designation of the IRGC, or the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, which has nothing to do with the deal. And we we spent a lot of time in which we told them, you want that lifted, you gotta do something in exchange in terms of the behavior of the IRGC. In the end, they dropped that. Now it's this question of the investigation by the IAEA. Again, nothing to do with the deal, delaying the deal. What does that say? You'd have to ask them. Are they at the moment of truth? Do they take a step back? Are they not prepared to to get back into the deal? Are they hoping for concessions that won't come? Our door is still open, if they want to go through, if they want to, to get this deal. But those two episodes show that at some point, the real discussion that needs to take place is not so much between the US and Iran, it's between Iran and itself. Is it prepared to take the steps necessary to get back into the deal? And if the answer is no, then we're going to have to see what other paths are available. But that's the urgent conversation that we think needs to take place.It sounds like you're take is that it's hard to negotiate with a country that moves the goalposts.Yes. It's also hard to negotiate with a country that refuses to talk to us, which has made everything more difficult, more time consuming, more prone to misunderstanding. We're prepared to have direct talks. They're not. So we've had to make do with with a very unsatisfactory, indirect conversation. 

This interview was lightly edited and condensed for clarity. 

The largest oil trader spoke about the US plan to replace Russian oil in the EU

Russia will have to sell oil in other markets at a discount, says Vitol's director. The EU plans to introduce a ceiling on commodity prices ) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi)” >

The United States will supply Europe with more than 1 million barrels of oil per day. oil to replace Russian crude. This was stated by the director of the Swiss-Dutch company Vitol, which is the world's largest oil trader, Russell Hardy on the sidelines of the 38th Asia-Pacific Oil Conference, Reuters reports.

According to Hardy, they will look for a “home” for Russian raw materials outside the US, UK and EU. “[Oil] will go farther and farther and find other markets, while it will have to be sold at a discount,” — says the director of the company.

In May, the European Union agreed to a ban on sea shipments of Russian oil, but the embargo did not affect the export of raw materials through pipelines, through which EU members, including Hungary, Germany and Poland, received about a third of the oil. Due to the decision of Poland and Germany to refuse any form of Russian oil supplies (by sea and pipelines), by the end of the year it will only enter the EU through the southern part of the Druzhba pipeline, which accounts for 10% of the total volume of oil purchased by the European Union from Russia, said the head of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen. The embargo is due to take effect in December. It will concern raw materials in their pure form and mixtures— so-called blends. If Russian and non-Russian oil is mixed in the batch, then it will be completely banned. However, if the supplier can clearly show which part of the batch is not produced in Russia, this part will be allowed on the European market.

Later, on September 23, the Financial Times, citing sources, reported that the eighth package of EU sanctions in response to partial mobilization and referendums in Donbass would include provisions for a ceiling on Russian oil prices. Bloomberg, citing sources, claimed that a decision could be made within a few weeks. The Russian authorities have repeatedly said that the country will stop supplying oil to those states that impose a price ceiling. The head of the Central Bank, Elvira Nabiullina, noted that this would lead to an increase in world prices for raw materials.

In late March, President Joe Biden announced his intention to release a record amount of crude oil— 180 million barrels— within six months to combat rising fuel prices and market disruptions. According to the plan, the US sells about 1 million barrels. oil per day. By September 16, strategic crude oil reserves in the United States fell to 427.2 million barrels, followed from a report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The Wall Street Journal wrote that this figure was the lowest since 1984.

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Rental housing stock in the US faces huge challenges adapting to climate change

“MuiTypography-root-134 MuiTypography-h1-139″>Rental housing stock in the US faces huge challenges adapting to climate change

What can renters and landlords can do to fortify homes against a changing climate while transitioning to cleaner energy?

Living on EarthSeptember 18, 2022 · 12:45 PM EDT

City view at McCulloh apartments at Druid Hill Avenue in Baltimore, Maryland, June 2019. 

Elvert Barnes Photography/Flickr

As climate change brings higher temperatures and extreme weather to American cities, rental and affordable housing stock in the US remains largely under-equipped to deal with these new challenges.

The Inflation Reduction Act signed by President Joe Biden in August provides funds and programs for homeowners to take climate action by, for example, installing solar panels and energy efficient heat pumps. But what about renters?

Renters typically use one third more energy per square foot than homeowners because landlords often don’t get a financial return on installing expensive upgrades to improve insulation and HVAC efficiency. And many renters are low-income people who can not afford higher energy costs.

But, according to Todd Nedwick, senior director of sustainability policy at the National Housing Trust, there are ways for people living in rental housing to go greener, save energy costs and guard against heat waves and other climate related risks.

“The Inflation Reduction Act included a $1 billion program specifically targeted to HUD housing stock that will allow building owners to invest both in the energy efficiency of the building as well as improve resilience,” Nedwick says.

Programs in the Inflation Reduction Act also provide rebates to both single-family and multi-family building owners to encourage them to invest in energy efficiency and convert existing fossil fuel-burning equipment to all electric, Nedwick adds.

“[I]n Washington, DC, where I'm from, buildings account for 75% of greenhouse gas emissions,” he points out. “So we're not going to address climate change if we're not addressing the existing housing stock. Climate policy is housing policy.”

Resilience upgrades include measures such as flood-proofing, elevating essential equipment above ground level to prevent disruption to power, and adding battery storage to buildings so residents still have a source of power if the electrical grid goes down.

Protecting residents from extreme heat is another important resilience strategy, Nedwisk adds. This includes adding cool roofs to buildings, for example, in order to reflect sunlight and prevent buildings from getting too hot.

“[I]n many cases, older buildings might not have air conditioning,” Nedwick points out. “And so, in addition to providing incentives for reducing energy consumption, we also need to be providing resources to help building owners upgrade their buildings and install air conditioning to protect residents from extreme heat. We're seeing extreme heat disproportionately impact people of color because they don't live in areas that have invested in and have the infrastructure to protect from rising temperatures.”

Building owners can also access energy efficiency programs offered by local utility companies, which help offset the cost of making building upgrades, Nedwick says. These are important resources for building owners, especially owners of affordable housing, who typically have limited cash flow to pay the upfront cost of major upgrades.

Some cities are also implementing policies such as energy performance standards for buildings, which require owners of poor performing buildings to make upgrades that reduce energy use.

“So, we are seeing both carrots and sticks,” Nedwick says. “I think what works most effectively is when you combine the two. [I]f you're going to have a building energy performance standard and require building owners to make upgrades, especially in affordable housing, providing resources to the owner to actually pay for some of those costs is pretty important.”

Energy efficiency and better weatherization aren’t the whole story, however. Climate change is increasing the danger to buildings from hurricanes, flooding and wildfires. According to Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies, 40% of rental housing stock in the US is at risk of damage from climate disasters.

Most of the country’s older rental housing stock is not built to withstand these impacts, Nedwick says.

“And we see that where there are the greatest risks in terms of potential climate events, those areas of the country are typically disproportionately Black, Hispanic, and low income individuals,” he points out. “So we have to fortify the existing rental housing stock to withstand climate events and protect existing residents.”

“In this country, we spend so much more funding on disaster recovery than we do disaster preparedness,” Nedwick continues. “And we've found that…the disaster recovery funding often doesn't reach renters and owners of rental housing. Typically, disaster recovery programs allocate funding based on the extent of the economic disruption from a climate event, and that often correlates with higher property values. As a result, a lot of the disaster recovery funding, especially through some of the FEMA programs, really [doesn’t] reach affordable housing residents and owners in an equitable way.”

RelatedBuilding high-rises, hotels and stadiums out of wood — for climate's sake

This article is based on an interview by Jenni Doering that aired on Living on Earth from PRX.

Bulgarian court allows extradition of Russian hacker to US – media

The Bulgarian court allowed the immediate extradition for further criminal prosecution of 36-year-old Russian citizen Denis Kloster. In the United States, he is accused of computer offenses, according to the Bulgarian publication 24 Hours.

The extradition was allowed on the basis of an official request from the US Department of Justice and the submitted documentation. The citizen of the Russian Federation has already agreed to be handed over to the US authorities. He believes that he will be able to prove his innocence in an American court.

The Bulgarian court decided to arrest Kloster until he was handed over to US officials. The court decision is not subject to appeal.

Earlier, hackers acting under the nickname Adrastea reported that they were selling data to MBDA Missile Systems, the largest arms manufacturer in Europe.

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FT learned about US and EU plans to put pressure on Turkey over Mir cards

FT: The US and the EU will put pressure on Turkish banks that have connected to the Mir system The EU intends to send a delegation to Turkey amid fears of circumventing sanctions against Russia, the newspaper writes. There are now many partners of Russia in Turkey – only some of the banks are not ready to serve Mir cards, the head of the NSPK said /756632212900866.png 673w” media=”(max-width: 320px) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi)” >

The United States and the European Union are stepping up pressure on Turkey to enforce sanctions against Russia. This is reported by The Financial Times, citing two sources.

According to the publication, Washington is focusing on Turkish banks that have connected to the Russian payment system “Mir”.

Brussels is also preparing a delegation to express their concerns to Turkish officials directly.

General Director of the National Payment Card System (NSPK) Vladimir Komlev, in turn, said that the cards of the Mir payment system, the failure of which was previously reported in Turkey, continue to function as before.

“Nothing bad has happened in Turkey, the work is going absolutely normal. Wherever the maps “Mir” were accepted, they are accepted, & mdash; he emphasized (quote from TASS).

According to Komlev, the Russian side contacted the Turkish partners, and they confirmed that there were no reasons to worry. There are many partners in Turkey now, some of the banks were not always ready to serve the cards of Russian banks that fell under sanctions before. “But these are just some of the banks,” — Komlev added.

Read on RBC Pro Pro x The Economist Brazilian JBS outperformed Nestlé and PepsiCo. Why investors are wary of it a wave of “quiet layoffs”. What will it lead to in Russia? Erdogan, after talks with Russian leader Vladimir Putin in Sochi, mentioned the topic of using Russian Mir cards in Turkey.

“There is also a card” World ” Russia. Now five of our banks are working on it. There are also very serious developments here,»,— said the Turkish leader.

After that, The Financial Times reported that Western authorities are increasingly concerned about deepening economic cooperation between Russia and Turkey and the growing risk of secondary sanctions against Ankara if it help Moscow circumvent the restrictions.

One of the European officials said that the EU is monitoring the cooperation between Moscow and Ankara “more and more closely”. “We are trying to get the Turks to pay attention to our concerns,” — stressed the source.

Turkish Deputy Finance Minister Nynus Elitash on August 21 assured the United States that official Ankara would not allow sanctions to be circumvented by any person or institution in Turkey.

In early March, Turkey refused to join sanctions against Russia, explaining this decision by the unwillingness to “burn bridges”, despite the support of Ukraine.

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Reuters learned about US plans to limit the supply of semiconductors to China

Reuters learned about US plans to expand restrictions on the supply of semiconductors to China As conceived by the authorities, the measure should help prevent the purchase of American technologies by China max-width: 320px) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi)” >

The administration of US President Joe Biden plans to expand restrictions on the supply of semiconductors for the production of chips and artificial intelligence tools to China in October. This was reported by Reuters, citing sources familiar with the matter.

According to the agency, the Department of Commerce will publish new rules for the export of semiconductors, which have already been mentioned in letters to three US companies— KLA Corp., Lam Research Corp. and Applied Materials Inc. The agency prohibited them from sending chip-making equipment to Chinese factories that produce advanced semiconductors with a manufacturing process of less than 14 nanometers without permission.

In addition, the ministry will consolidate the rules contained in the letters to Nvidia Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices in August. Companies were required to suspend shipments of several types of artificial intelligence computing chips unless they had a special license.

US authorities may impose licensing requirements for China to ship products with targeted chips, one source said. The list may include data center servers that contain the Nvidia A100 chip from Dell Technologies, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and Super Micro Computer.

A senior Commerce Department official declined to comment on plans to expand restrictions. The agency spokesman spoke of a “comprehensive approach to complementary actions to protect US interests,” as well as intentions to prevent China from acquiring US technology to modernize the military.

The US began restricting the sale of American technology to Chinese companies in 2020. Among them were firms such as Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp. and Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co. The measure restrained the growth rate of firms, but stimulated production, and then large Western companies became interested in Chinese manufacturers, wrote Bloomberg.

Read on RBC Pro Pro China's housing market is in a bubble. Can it provoke a global crisis Articles Pro In IT, you can have a high salary in your first position. Who to study for Pro Instructions Doesn't give advice and is indifferent to prestige: 3 types of executive magnets Pro Instructions “We in Washington love to eat pizza”: why hockey player Ovechkin is against diets I Learned on the Phone”: Adidas CEO on Career Pivots Pro Articles Five Tips to Start Meditating Regularly Pro Instructions “Learning to Set People Up Diplomatically”: What It's Like to Work at Amazon Articles In June, the agency indicated that over the past year, 19 of 20 companies from China became the fastest growing within the industry among other countries. Suppliers of software, processors, and equipment vital to chip manufacturing have increased revenues by several times those of the world's industry leaders.

In July, Reuters reported that the Biden administration had asked for allies impose similar restrictions on the supply of semiconductors to prevent foreign companies from selling technology to China bypassing the US ban.

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NYT announces US assistance in preparing Ukraine’s counteroffensive

The United States provided Kyiv with data on command posts, Russian army ammunition depots, “constantly” discussed a way to stop the Russian advance in eastern Ukraine, writes The New York Times,

The US and Ukraine stepped up intelligence sharing over the summer, allowing Washington to provide better and more up-to-date information for Kyiv's planning of a counteroffensive in the country's northeast, The New York Times reported, citing unnamed US officials.

Sources declined to say , what details of the counter-offensive plan Ukraine disclosed to the United States and what advice the American side gave, but one of them indicated that Washington and Kyiv “permanently” discussed a way to stop Russia's advance in the east of the country.

The interlocutors of the publication admitted that the current offensive could be the initial stage of the Ukrainian Armed Forces campaign, which “may significantly push back the Russian front line.”

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According to The New York Times, throughout the operation, the United States provided Ukraine with information about command posts, ammunition depots and other key nodes of the Russian army.

Ukraine's decision to announce a counteroffensive in the south before striking in the northeast is a standard disorientation technique used by U.S. special operations forces that have been training Ukrainians since 2014, the newspaper notes.

Read on RBC Pro Pro They're either fans or haters: how to make buzzers regulars Instructions Pro Five tips to start meditating regularly Instructions Pro How the “antelope method” will help you cope with stress in five minutes Articles Pro China's housing market is a bubble. Could it trigger a global crisis Pro Articles The 3 Most Bad Habits of Businessmen and How to Beat Them Pro Instructions “We're Afraid of the Gods and Bosses”: What It's Like to Work in India in 4 Points Pro Articles Eight Tips for Those Who Want to Learn to Run Regularly Pro Instructions The Method Red: How an American Made $1.3 Billion in a Resale Business They were taught irregular warfare. Our scouts taught them deception and psychological operations, & mdash; said former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Evelyn Farkas, who oversaw US military relations with Russia and Ukraine from 2012 to 2015.

Some U.S. officials are reserved in their assessments, noting that it is too early to determine whether the Ukrainian Armed Forces will be able to continue the offensive, as the Ukrainian military faces a shortage of supplies, especially artillery shells.

First Deputy Minister of Information of the DPR Daniil Bezsonov and military correspondents Alexander Kots and Yevgeny Poddubny announced on September 10 that the allied troops were leaving Izyum. According to Poddubny, the command made the right decision, since “the encirclement of the Russian group in Izyum would be a disaster.”

On September 10, the Ministry of Defense announced the decision to regroup troops in the Balakleya and Izyum regions in order to increase efforts in the Donetsk direction.

Within three days, the Izyum-Balakleya grouping was rolled up and transferred to the territory of the DPR. During this time, more than 2 thousand Ukrainian and foreign fighters, more than 100 armored vehicles and artillery units were destroyed, according to the Ministry of Defense.

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US announces India’s openness to oil price ceiling

Deputy Finance Minister Wally Adeyemo stressed that India is considering the possibility of joining the imposition of a cap on Russian oil

India is open to the idea of ​​imposing a price cap on Russian oil— the measure by which a number of Western countries hope to deprive Russia of increased revenues from a jump in energy prices and at the same time not cause a new increase,— U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Wally Adeyemo told Bloomberg.

“This weekend I was encouraged by a message from India's oil minister that they are considering joining,”— he explained.

However, he added that even if some countries do not decide to join the initiative that the G7 member states are promoting, they will still have more opportunities to negotiate price reductions in the future.

On Monday, the Minister of Oil and Gas Hardeep Singh Puri reported that India is aware of the proposal of the G7 countries to limit the price of Russian oil and will carefully consider it.

India has been actively buying Russian oil since April, wrote Nikkei Asia. Then imports amounted to 390 thousand barrels per day, in May— 650 thousand barrels, in June— 980 thousand (according to Reuters— 950 thousand).

At the beginning of the summer, Russia became the second largest oil exporter to India, overtaking Saudi Arabia in terms of supplies. Iraq came first. Reuters then wrote that the interest of buyers from Europe in oil from Russia decreased against the backdrop of sanctions, so India got the opportunity to make purchases at a big discount.

Read on RBC Pro Pro You can trade remotely on Chinese marketplaces. What You Need to Know How To Pro The Loser Scenario: Who's Affected And How To Avoid It follow the Iranian path in the IT sector >G7 countries have agreed to introduce a ceiling on the cost of Russian oil on September 2. This means that companies will refuse to insure and provide financial support for tankers with Russian oil if it costs more than the agreed ceiling.

The G7 finance ministers did not indicate its size in the final communiqué: “The initial price limit will be set at a level based on a set of technical data and will be determined by the entire coalition prior to implementation in each jurisdiction.

According to the Institute of International Finance (IIF), 90% of the ships in the world are insured by the British “International Group of Clubs Mutual Insurance» (International Group of P & I Clubs). Britain is one of the countries participating in the G7.

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Bloomberg learned about Biden’s plans to limit US investment in China

According to agency sources, Biden intends to create a system in the United States that will allow the government to directly block investments in China's technology sector /756621881448911.jpg 673w” media=”(max-width: 320px) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi)” >

Bloomberg learned about Biden's plans to limit US investment in China

The administration of US President Joe Biden is considering taking measures that would limit US investment in Chinese technology companies. This is reported by Bloomberg, citing sources.

According to one of the interlocutors of the agency, the president may sign a corresponding decree “in the coming months.” It is possible that separate steps will be taken in relation to the social network TikTok. The Commerce Department, according to the source, may impose additional restrictions on chips used for artificial intelligence systems.

The White House is also discussing legislation with Congress that would require companies to disclose in advance information about possible investments in certain sectors of the Chinese economy. added another source. In addition, the creation of a system that will allow the government to block investments directly is being discussed, but a final decision has not been made at the moment.

Bloomberg notes that prior to this, the United States conducted a softer policy towards China's technology sector. The exceptions were the semiconductor industry and companies such as Huawei and Semiconductor, which are accused of endangering US national security.

Last week, the US government informed the American company Nvidia about the introduction of new export licenses for China and Russia: now its products are prohibited from being sold to these countries. Under the new licensing requirements, restrictions apply to GPU (graphics processing unit) accelerators that meet certain performance criteria, such as the A100 and H100 series products. Such models are used to work with artificial intelligence and increase the performance of calculations at times.

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As stated in a document on the website of the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), in this way, the US authorities want to eliminate the risk that products covered by an export license can be used or diverted for “military end use”; in China and Russia.

Former US President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning American funds from investing in Chinese companies in November 2020. Trump banned investments in 31 companies, including Huawei, China Mobile, China Telecom and China Railway Construction Corporation. In the last days of his presidency, Trump added nine more companies to the list, among which was Xiaomi.

Later, Biden expanded the list to 59 companies. Among others, China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), China State Military Industrial Company (CASIC) and China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) were included in the list.

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US general urges US authorities to allow Ukraine to attack Russian territory

Retired American Brigadier General Mark Arnold told Channel 24 that NATO and the US should give Kyiv weapons to strike deep into Russia and allow such attacks.

Photo: pixabay.com

Retired American brigadier general Mark Arnold, in an interview with Channel 24, said that NATO and the United States should give Kyiv weapons to strike deep into Russia and allow such attacks.

According to him, the requirement of Western countries for Ukraine not to use weapons received from allies against Moscow is a “big strategic mistake.”

“White House officials and their allies should provide the Kyiv regime with weapons capable of delivering strikes on Russian territory. Now I'm not talking about Crimea. NATO and the United States say: “Do not strike at the territory of Russia”. I think that such words are stupid,” Arnold said.

He clarified that in order to achieve their goals, the Armed Forces need to attack objects that “located hundreds of kilometers inland of Russia.”

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China vows to retaliate if US provokes in Taiwan Strait

The Chinese Armed Forces, against the backdrop of US ships in the Taiwan Strait, declared full combat readiness Two American cruisers entered the Taiwan Strait – the US Navy called ship movements routine. Beijing recalled that the army is in a state of full combat readiness, and stated that they would monitor the cruisers .jpg 673w” media=”(max-width: 320px) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi)” >

The Chinese military is monitoring the movements of US ships in the Taiwan Strait and maintaining full combat readiness, the country's military said in a statement to Reuters.

Earlier, the agency, citing three US officials, said that the Strait entered two ships of the US Navy— cruisers Chancellorsville and Antietam.

The Navy subsequently confirmed to the agency that the ships made a “routine crossing of the Taiwan Strait” without violating international law. Such actions usually take from eight to 12 hours.

Reuters writes that the ships are crossing the strait for the first time since US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan in early August. Her trip led to an aggravation of relations between Washington and Beijing: the latter called the actions of the American side an attempt to interfere in the internal affairs of China and said that Pelosi's visit is contrary to the “one China” policy, which the United States formally adheres to.

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Against this background, the Chinese army declared a state of full combat readiness. Beijing announced that it had begun firing exercises near the island— Taiwan also increased its combat readiness after that.

After Pelosi's visit, three more American delegations visited Taiwan. The Chinese authorities condemned their arrival and warned the Taiwanese Democratic Progressive Party of doomed to failure “attempts to persuade external anti-Chinese forces to provocations.” ready to fulfill any whim. Why is this a reason to change a doctor Instructions Pro In Russia, managers are expected to be masculine. How it limits creativity Instructions Pro “Feeling of omnipotence”: billionaire Igor Rybakov – about the benefits of sports Articles Pro Strongest. Business by Netflix Rules Summary Pro How an otaku can help you choose the right market niche Articles Pro Simons, Marks and other billionaires got rid of these shares: an overview Articles Pro In 1949, he announced secession from China. The PRC authorities still consider the island their territory, the United States does not officially recognize its independence either.

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US intelligence promised to assess the threat due to papers found on Trump

U.S. Intelligence to Assess Security Threats from Trump's Seized Documents Director of National Intelligence Avril Haynes sent a letter to Congress promising to assess the potential national security risk from documents found during a search of the ex-president

US intelligence has promised to assess the threat due to papers found on Trump

U.S. intelligence will assess the potential national security risk if documents found during a search of former President Donald Trump's residence become public, Reuters and Politico report, citing a letter from Director of National Intelligence Avril Haynes to the chairman of the House Intelligence Select Committee. Adam Schiff and House Oversight Committee Chairperson Carolyn Maloney.

“We are pleased that, in response to our appeal, Director Haynes confirmed that intelligence and the Department of Justice are assessing the damage that may have been caused by the improper storage of classified documents in Mar-a-Lago, — Maloney and Schiff said in a statement cited by Politico.

On August 26, the DOJ released an affidavit (authenticated affidavit) from an FBI agent who said the bureau had identified 184 documents containing “national defense information” after after Trump returned 15 boxes of papers to the US National Archives. They, according to the testimony, also contained handwritten notes of the ex-president.

According to Schiff and Maloney, the published testimony “confirms serious concerns” Congress because among the documents found at the Trump residence, there are those that can cause damage.

On August 8, FBI agents raided the residence of the former American leader. The National Archives and Records Administration suggested in February that Trump had taken 15 boxes of documents, including classified documents, from the White House. The papers were later returned, but the DOJ initiated the issuance of a search warrant by the FBI to make sure the agents made sure that he had no documents removed.

According to the inventory of the seized, 11 sets of documents were found in Mar-a-Lago, on some of them were labeled “confidential”, “secret”, “top secret”; and “confidential classified information.” The former president was suspected, among other things, of violating the law on espionage, wrote Politico.

Read on RBC Pro Pro Polymetal shares up 82% from lows. We understand why Forecasts Pro What are the chances of paying dividends in the latest report of MTS Articles Pro How to make friends with colleagues and why is it needed at all: four tips Articles Pro In Russia there is an acute shortage of 1C specialists: where can I get them : what the boss's friendship with subordinates leads to Instructions Pro What shares have been bought recently by Dalio, Soros and other billionaires Articles Pro Selling commercial real estate in Russia from abroad: what are the difficulties Instructions Pro How to protect yourself from corporate fraud – 6 stages Articles >Trump insists that he declassified documents he kept during his tenure as head of state, and called the searches themselves “an un-American, unjustified and unnecessary raid and infiltration.” The ex-president demanded to return the papers confiscated from him.

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WSJ learned about US plans to appoint a general for the mission of helping Ukraine

The name of the US mission in Ukraine is expected according to the type of Iraqi and Afghan ones. The WSJ writes that this could mean a reversal from targeted efforts to help Kyiv to a longer-term program. with reference to American officials. He will lead the country's efforts to train the military and provide assistance to Kyiv.

The name of the mission will be a formal recognition of the US military efforts, the newspaper writes, similar to when the Pentagon named its operations in Iraq and Afghanistan (“« Iraqi Freedom”, “Enduring Freedom” and others).

The decision to name the training and assistance mission is bureaucratically significant, as it usually entails long-term dedicated funding and the ability to assign special payments, ribbons of distinction and awards to military personnel participating in this operation, writes WSJ. As the publication notes, the choice of a general, who is expected to be two- or three-star (equivalent to the concept of major general and lieutenant general, respectively— RBC), reflects the creation of a team responsible for coordinating, as well as the transition from a largely ad hoc effort to providing training and support to Ukraine over many years».

On Wednesday, August 25, President Joe Biden announced the provision of Ukraine's largest military aid package of $2.98 billion, which will include weapons and equipment. Biden specified that this tranche would allow Kyiv to acquire air defense systems, artillery, ammunition for it, anti-missile unmanned aerial systems and radars.

U.S. Under Secretary of Defense for Political Affairs Colin Kahl reported that the decision to allocate a new aid package was taken in close contact with Ukraine.

First Deputy Permanent Representative of Russia to the UN Dmitry Polyansky, answering a question about whether Moscow was concerned about the decision of the United States, said that this “does not change the situation on Earth very much.” At the same time, he acknowledged that the situation in the war zone will become more difficult for the Russian military, since the United States is supplying Ukraine with MLRS that can finish off areas previously inaccessible to the Ukrainian military.

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The State Duma explained when the US will “surrender Zelensky”

Photo: Dmitry Katorzhnov

State Duma deputy from United Russia Oleg Morozov expressed the opinion that the regime of Ukrainian President Vladimir Zelensky is doomed, moreover they will turn their backs on him in Washington.

“The Americans will hand him over when a negotiator acceptable to Russia is needed,” the politician said.

He added that the greater the success of the Russian military in during the course of a special military operation, the more precarious Zelensky's position will become.

According to Morozov, along with the depletion of resources for military resistance, Zelensky's tasks will also be exhausted.

After that, “politicians will be needed , with whom you can talk without fear of getting your hands dirty”.

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New package of US military aid to Ukraine turned out to be mocking

“They are waiting for the promised three years”

The United States announced another $3 billion military aid package to Ukraine. However, as US Deputy Secretary of Defense Colin Kohl explained, the new package is a demonstration of the Americans' commitment to “Ukraine's long-term security.” And so long-term that, according to Kohl, it turns out, “has nothing to do with the fights today, tomorrow or next week.” Military experts told MK what supplies this package is about.

Photo: Global Look Press

According to General Colin Cole, the new weapon will be in the “square” in “one, two or three years.” The Pentagon will first have to conclude contracts for its production. So it's still a big question, who is the Pentagon actually planning to help: Kyiv or its own military-industrial complex?

The new package of military assistance to Kyiv is promised: six short- and medium-range mobile anti-aircraft missile systems NASAMS with ammunition for them; artillery shells for 155 mm howitzers; 24 anti-artillery radar systems; 120 mm mortar ammunition; means of combating Vampire drones; reconnaissance drones Puma and equipment for reconnaissance drones Scan Eagle.

As well as laser-guided missile systems; Claymore anti-personnel ammunition; twenty 120-mm mortars and 20 thousand shells for them; hundreds of anti-tank systems AT4, 1000 Javelin and, of course, ammunition for HIMARS, as well as funds for the training of military personnel of the Armed Forces of Ukraine.

Military expert Yuriy Podolyaka wondered why this long-term assistance package is only about six mobile anti-aircraft NASAMS short and medium range missile systems? Such a volume of supplies will not solve the problem of covering the airspace of Ukraine.

On his Telegram channel, he noted that this complex, created on the basis of American short-range and medium-range air-to-air missiles, will be provided to the Ukrainian armed forces for the first time. And the number “6” indicates that these are just tests. The Americans are delivering a battery pack that they are going to test in real combat conditions against their most important enemy.

That is, in this case, the Pentagon took care of its military-industrial complex and its army, but definitely not about Ukraine. At first, the NATO countries used to float all their old weapons there in order to save on its disposal, and now they are turning Ukraine into a testing ground.

General Cole, by the way, said that the main emphasis in the planned supply of ammunition, the Pentagon is going to put on a family of 227 mm GMLRS guided missiles used in the M270 MLRS and M142 HIMARS multiple launch rocket systems. Allegedly, it was they who had an “incredible effect” in Ukraine when “Ukrainians use them for high-precision strikes on command posts, logistics hubs and other logistics facilities.” This, as the general stated, “gave the effect of disrupting the advance of Russian troops in the east.”

Kol, of course, did not remember a single civilian object that was hit by their HIMARS with GMLRS shells. What for? However, the captain of the 1st rank in the reserve, Vladimir Gundarov, in an interview with the MK journalist, drew attention to an important fact.

“Long-range missiles for HIMARS were not given to the Ukrainians again,” says Gundarov, “although this issue was raised and resolved at the highest level in the United States. Again they said that they would have enough missiles with a range of up to 90 km for their eyes. And this means that in the event of the supply of long-range weapons, the Americans are still seriously afraid of an escalation of the conflict in Ukraine.

The expert recalled that Chancellor Scholz also promised to supply Ukraine with weapons worth more than 500 million euros.

– True, he will be able to do this no earlier than 2023, – Gundarov clarifies. – I wonder how many regions will then remain part of Ukraine? Moreover, immediately after Scholz's promises, literally the very next day, German Foreign Minister Annalena Berbock announced that Germany had an “absolute shortage” of its own military reserves. Simply put, they would like to help, but there is nothing. Just like the Americans. All the money from the announced US assistance package will go to corporations of the American military-industrial complex, and only promises to Ukrainians.

According to Gundarov, the British, too, under the pretext of a special operation in Ukraine, are in a hurry to feed their military-industrial complex.

– True, during his last visit to Kyiv, – the expert says, – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson somehow already said not too confidently about the possibility of Ukraine to “win” … But he promised Kyiv 850 Black Hornet micro-drones, designed specifically for residential use. Apparently, the “humane British colonizers”, who have a rich historical experience of shooting civilians in their colonies, now hope to turn every Ukrainian city and village into a field of fierce battles.

Источник www.mk.ru

US will support Ukraine against Russian aggression ‘as long as it takes,’ US State Dept. spokesperson says

“MuiTypography-root-134 MuiTypography-h1-139″>US will support Ukraine against Russian aggression ‘as long as it takes,’ US State Dept. spokesperson says

Ned Price, the US State Department’s top spokesperson, told The World's host Carol Hills that the United States is prepared to support Ukraine for as long as necessary to defeat Russian aggression and to also defend themselves against any future aggression.

The WorldAugust 25, 2022 · 11:15 AM EDT

Ukrainian servicemen prepare their weapon to fire Russian positions in Kharkiv region, Ukraine, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2022.

Andrii Marienko/AP

Six months into Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, US President Joe Biden chose Ukrainian Independence Day to announce almost $3 billion in funding toward new weapons for Ukraine.

“This is about assistance to provide Ukraine with the anti-air systems, with anti-drone technology, with the UAVs, with radars that will help them over the longer term deter and defend themselves against any future aggression, well after this is over,” said Ned Price, the US State Department’s top spokesperson. 

Price joined The World’s host Carol Hills to delve into US policy on the war. 

Carol Hills: So, how much longer can the US sustain this level of funding?Ned Price: We have made very clear that we are going to be with Ukraine for as long as it takes. We have had a tremendous partner in the US Congress. We're able to do much of this because of the funding, the emergency supplemental funding that Congress put forward earlier this year. It was $40 billion.A New York Times story this week noted that aid agencies have pointed out how the West is focusing on Ukraine, where the population is mostly white and Christian, leaving few resources for those fleeing violence and being pushed to the brink of famine in Africa and the Middle East. Is that a fair critique?It's not a fair critique, because the United States is the world's humanitarian leader. We've spoken of the aid and assistance we provided to Ukraine, but we have done that across continents, across countries, the world over. We have announced billions of dollars for Africa, for other parts of the world.It's been six months since Russia invaded Ukraine and the war has sort of slowed to a grind. How do US officials see this war playing out?Our long-term goal is simple. It is to see that Ukraine remains independent, to see it remain sovereign, to see it remain democratic, but with the means to defend itself against any further aggression. We are going to stick by Ukraine until Russia is prepared to negotiate.Even if that takes years?We will be there with Ukraine for as long as it takes.What if Ukraine decides to carry the war to Russia? Will the US continue to back them?Everything we have provided Ukraine to date has been for their self-defense. Ukraine has every right to use force on its own territory. We have provided them with the weapons and the systems they need, not only to defend themselves, their civilian population, their infrastructure against this Russian brutality, but to take aim at Russian aggressors on sovereign Ukrainian territory, who are carrying out this war.The US says that Ukraine will not use US-supplied rocket systems to hit Russian territory. But what about special operations against targets across the Russian border? Is that OK with Washington?What is OK with us and what we have provided are systems for Ukraine to use to defend itself against Russian territory. We've been clear that the weapons we've provided, the systems we've provided, are for use on sovereign Ukrainian territory. I'm just not going to entertain hypotheticals that go beyond that.Now, Russia has another big card to play, a cold winter in Europe. How do you see the winter ahead, especially when it comes to Europe's reliance on Russia for energy?We have been working intensively with our European allies, but also partners around the world to do a couple of things. One is near-term, to see to it that there is adequate global energy supply, including shifting supply of LNG, for example, from the Indo-Pacific to Europe, ahead of this winter. We have also tapped into our Strategic Petroleum Reserve at an unprecedented level. Countries around the world are doing the same to see to it that we can stabilize the global energy supply.The situation with the Russian-occupied Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant in Ukraine, it's really unprecedented in a war for that to happen. How concerned are you about that situation?Well, we are concerned and we're monitoring it very closely. We know that in combat operations, Russians staging their forces at this nuclear power plant — it is the height of irresponsibility. What we're calling for is an end to combat operations, to Russia's combat operations in and around the nuclear plant. We're calling, with our international partners, for a demilitarized zone. And we're also calling for access on the part of the IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] to this nuclear facility as soon as possible. We've heard from the Russians that they expect the IAEA could visit as soon as next month. That is too long. This needs to happen as soon as possible.But if Russia allows IAEA inspectors to visit the plant, isn't that ceding authority of that plant and giving Russia, sort of tacitly saying, yeah, it's your plant?Well, it is Ukraine's plant.No, it is Russia's plant if they're the ones giving the authority to IAEA inspectors.This is a plant that is on sovereign Ukrainian territory. It is our position that Russia should vacate its positions at the plant that day, that the IAEA should have access to this plant. Russia has no right to anything that is on sovereign Ukrainian territory.You said the war in Ukraine will only end at the negotiating table. Who is in a position to facilitate that?Well, ultimately, these are going to be decisions that our Ukrainian partners will have to make for themselves. It is our charge, in the meantime — and by "our," I mean the collective "we," the United States and our partners and allies around the world — to provide Ukraine with what they need to strengthen their hand on the battlefield, knowing that if they are stronger on the battlefield, they will be ultimately stronger at any negotiating table that's to emerge.President Vladimir Zelenskiy keeps saying he wants to retake Crimea. He really wants to regain things he's lost. What sort of initiatives are Ukraine and its allies prepared to offer as an off-ramp to get negotiations going and to really find a peace with Russia?Well, again, these are all decisions that President Zelenskiy and his government, and ultimately the Ukrainian people, will have to make. We don't dictate targets. We don't dictate tactics. But every inch of land that Russia has seized or attempted to seize legitimately belongs to Ukraine.So, even if they want to retake Crimea, the US is willing to hang in and keep funding indefinitely?Again, we don't dictate targets. We don't dictate tactics. We provide our Ukrainian partners with what they need for self-defense. But Crimea is Ukraine.Can't the US help fight this war in providing aid and weapons as it is doing, and also help negotiate an end to it, at the same time?I am sure we will have a helping role to play, an assisting role to play, when it comes to any diplomacy that leads to an endgame when it comes to Russia's war against Ukraine. The challenge is that we have a willing Ukrainian partner, but there is no Russian counterpart to meet them at the negotiating table. So, there is not a true role for the United States to play at this time beyond providing Ukraine with what it needs to strengthen its hand on the battlefield, which will, in turn, strengthen its hand on any negotiating table that emerges.This far into the war, what do you think is different in the world order now than it was before this invasion?Well, we're defending the principle that might doesn't make right, that big countries can't bully small countries, that borders can't be redrawn by force and that a country's foreign policy can be dictated only by the sovereign decisions of a sovereign government and an independent people. That is something that Russia is trying to challenge. It's also something, by the way, that other countries around the world are trying to challenge. And there's one particularly large country, economically powerful country halfway around the world in the Indo-Pacific, that would like to see an opening to challenge these very principles. That's why it's so important that we do, and the international community does, everything we can to preserve, defend and reinforce these rules.

This interview was lightly edited and condensed for clarity. 

Related: Many Germans fear 'active participation in war' as country increases military aid to Ukraine

New aid package: US prepares Ukraine for protracted conflict

Arms promised by Washington to Kyiv will not arrive soon

U.S. President Joe Biden will speak by phone with Volodymyr Zelensky after announcing another $3 billion in military aid for Ukraine. This was announced by the public relations coordinator of the National Security Council, John Kirby, while stressing that Biden has no plans for a trip to Kyiv. Meanwhile, as Politico points out, while Biden is pumping billions into the long conflict in Ukraine, don't expect to see new weapons on the battlefield anytime soon.

Photo: Global Look Press

America's involvement in the conflict in Ukraine entered a new phase on Wednesday as the Biden administration moved to funnel billions of dollars directly into the US defense industry to support Kyiv's long-term standoff with Russia, Politico writes.

The White House is also preparing to send to Congress a new plan to resupply the warehouses of NATO's Baltic allies, who have sent their own equipment to help Ukraine in the fighting.

As Politico notes, Ukraine's needs remain urgent and urgent military assistance packages will no doubt continue to arrive in the coming weeks and months. At the same time, Western allies are looking at the Ukrainian conflict as a long game.

On Wednesday, the Biden administration announced a new $3 billion package that will directly fund contracts with the US defense industry for artillery shells, mortar shells, anti-aircraft missile systems; new anti-drone capabilities; additional drones; and 24 counter-battery radars. The move marks a major shift in how the US supplies Ukraine, from removing existing weapons from warehouse shelves to contracting defense firms for weapons that need to be produced.

None of this equipment will arrive for months, if not years, Politico stresses. But officials say the investment will allow Kyiv to begin planning its own future defenses. There is a possibility that other wealthy European countries, which have at times lagged behind in their support for Ukraine, may follow the US lead in the coming months.

“What needs to be done now, — is to build this long-term pipeline, — said Politico  one of the Western diplomats on condition of anonymity. –  At some point, especially for the US, UK and some immediate neighbors such as Estonia and Poland, who have been generous with the equipment they have, donating existing stocks will not be sustainable forever.

Some analysts have expressed surprised that Wednesday's package includes such supplies as artillery and mortar shells, which the US is supplying in the tens of thousands from its own stockpile.

“This may indicate that some of these items are becoming scarce in the Department of Defense stocks and that the Department of Defense cannot supply them from existing stocks,” — says Mark Kanchian, Senior Advisor for the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Production delays and cold production lines mean some of these goods could be slow to ship to both the US and Ukraine.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov said Wednesday that the Ukrainian government is grateful for a $3 billion aid package.

Overall, the U.S. Congress has allocated $6.3 billion to the Pentagon's efforts: $6 billion through May's $40 billion additional aid bill and $300 million through a nationwide funding package passed in March. According to Pentagon records seen by Politico, only $1.8 billion of those funds had been used as of August 1.

Senator Zhanna Shakhin, a longtime advocate of increased military aid to Ukraine, says the multibillion-dollar tranche is indicative of an expanding U.S. commitment to Kyiv as the conflict continues. “This new aid package demonstrates the US commitment to Ukraine's long-term security by investing in the potential to bolster Ukraine's defenses for years to come,” — the senator said in a statement.

A $40 billion military and humanitarian aid package was calculated until at least the fall.

The package includes $19 billion in direct military support for Ukraine, $3.9 billion in support of U.S. troops deployed in Europe, and $2 billion in long-term support for NATO allies and the U.S. modernization program.

This military support includes $6 billion in a Pentagon account to arm Ukraine, as well as $4 billion in State Department external military funding for Ukraine and other NATO countries on the alliance's eastern fringe. And the Pentagon will allocate roughly $9 billion to the defense industry to restock missiles and other weapons and equipment shipped to Ukraine.

According to supporters, the uncertain political landscape in the US, where funding for another major Ukrainian package could collide problems on Capitol Hill, makes these long-term contracts even more important in order to put Ukraine on a solid footing, Politico points out.

Источник www.mk.ru

Why has polio emerged in the US, UK and Israel? A polio eradication expert weighs in.

“MuiTypography-root-134 MuiTypography-h1-139″>Why has polio emerged in the US, UK and Israel? A polio eradication expert weighs in.

New cases of polio have emerged in the US and Israel, and the disease has been detected in wastewater in the UK. Oliver Rosenbauer, the spokesperson for polio eradication at the World Health Organization, explains how some of them could be linked to the oral vaccine that's long been used to prevent the disease.

The WorldAugust 24, 2022 · 3:00 PM EDT

A worker walks alongside the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant's array of digester eggs in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Officials revealed last month that polio has shown up in New York sewers, suggesting it is spreading, Aug. 12, 2022.

John Minchillo/AP/File photo

The United States saw its first polio case in nearly a decade this summer. The virus has also infected several children in Israel this year and has been found in London's wastewater. Genetic analysis has linked some of these cases to the oral vaccine long used to prevent polio.

To discuss the situation, The World's host Carol Hills spoke with Oliver Rosenbauer, the spokesperson for polio eradication at the World Health Organization, who joined from Geneva. 

Carol Hills: So, how does the oral polio vaccine actually cause polio?Oliver Rosenbauer: Well, they're not exactly caused by the polio vaccine itself. What is happening is the oral polio vaccine that is being used — and that's been used all over the world billions of times, and through which polio has been almost globally eradicated — it contains a live vaccine virus. It's a weakened vaccine virus, but it's live. So, what happens is that you give this vaccine to a child and that child develops immunity, and then the vaccine virus basically multiplies in that child's gut and is actually excreted in the stool, just like a normal polio virus would. And it can actually spread to other children. In 99% of the cases, that's actually a good thing, because you passively immunize other children that way. The problem is, if you allow this vaccine virus to continue to spread in the community and to continue to circulate, and if that happens, it can become, again, genetically changed from a weakened vaccine virus to a strong vaccine virus, able to cause paralysis. And that's what is known as a vaccine-derived polio virus.What's interesting is this oral vaccine has been around for decades. Why are we seeing these cases pop up now?Well, I think we're not just seeing these cases pop up now. We've been seeing them pop up throughout the use of this particular vaccine. It's just that it's popped up in a place like New York, which hasn't had polio in a long, long time. The risk of these things emerging are very, very low. And the reason why we use this particular vaccine is that it has the ability to interrupt person-to-person spread. There's another vaccine that is used. It's called the inactivated polio vaccine — or the Salk vaccine, if you like — and it's injected. It contains an inactivated polio vaccine and it offers excellent personal protection. But the drawback on that is [that] it offers very limited ability to be able to stop person-to-person spread of the virus, and in an eradication effort, that's what we're really after.So, is there any risk of a widespread outbreak in places like the US and the UK of polio now? I mean, should we be worried?I would say the following: I think both the UK and the US did a fantastic job in identifying a public health risk. You know, there's one case in New York, which is a paralytic case — one person paralyzed by the disease, which is tragic — but for the most part, the virus has been only isolated in sewage systems. So, the local authorities have identified this risk and are, right now, doing all the right things in addressing this public health risk. And the name of the game now is to make sure that you do not allow polio to reestablish a foothold in your community. And to do that, you make sure that your population is fully vaccinated.There's been such a push to get people vaccinated against COVID-19, with messaging about how the vaccine is safe and effective, there's no risk of getting COVID-19 from the vaccine. Do you worry about how this news about polio might impact people's decisions to get vaccinated against COVID-19 or other viruses?We're worried about any person who is not vaccinated against polio, because then that individual is not protected. And certainly the vaccine that's being used in the United States, the inactivated polio vaccine, it's one of the safest, if not the safest vaccine that is out there. It is a killed vaccine virus, so there is absolutely no chance of catching polio from it. There is no chance that you would see these vaccine-derived polio cases arise with inactivated polio vaccines. The only thing that it will do, is to protect you from lifelong paralysis. And, most of us have forgotten what polio actually is. It is a devastating, deadly disease. It is an extremely painful disease. And it is so easily preventable, and so, if it's a matter of getting one injection in the arm, which is completely safe, and then be sure and be assured that you're not going to catch this disease, I think it's worth doing, definitely.

This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.

Related: An upcoming vaccine drive in Afghanistan is an ‘unprecedented opportunity’ to eradicate polio, UN official says

Why are new polio cases popping up in the US, UK and Israel? A polio eradication expert weighs in.

“MuiTypography-root-134 MuiTypography-h1-139″>Why are new polio cases popping up in the US, UK and Israel? A polio eradication expert weighs in.

New cases of polio have emerged in the US, UK and Israel. Oliver Rosenbauer, the spokesperson for polio eradication at the World Health Organization, explains how some of them could be linked to the oral vaccine that's long been used to prevent the disease.

The WorldAugust 24, 2022 · 3:00 PM EDT

A worker walks alongside the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant's array of digester eggs in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. Officials revealed last month that polio has shown up in New York sewers, suggesting it is spreading, Aug. 12, 2022.

John Minchillo/AP/File photo

The United States saw its first polio case in nearly a decade this summer. The virus has also infected several children in Israel this year and has been found in London's wastewater. Genetic analysis has linked some of these cases to the oral vaccine long used to prevent polio.

To discuss the situation, The World's host Carol Hills spoke with Oliver Rosenbauer, the spokesperson for polio eradication at the World Health Organization, who joined from Geneva. 

Carol Hills: So, how does the oral polio vaccine actually cause polio?Oliver Rosenbauer: Well, they're not exactly caused by the polio vaccine itself. What is happening is the oral polio vaccine that is being used — and that's been used all over the world billions of times, and through which polio has been almost globally eradicated — it contains a live vaccine virus. It's a weakened vaccine virus, but it's live. So, what happens is that you give this vaccine to a child and that child develops immunity, and then the vaccine virus basically multiplies in that child's gut and is actually excreted in the stool, just like a normal polio virus would. And it can actually spread to other children. In 99% of the cases, that's actually a good thing, because you passively immunize other children that way. The problem is, if you allow this vaccine virus to continue to spread in the community and to continue to circulate, and if that happens, it can become, again, genetically changed from a weakened vaccine virus to a strong vaccine virus, able to cause paralysis. And that's what is known as a vaccine-derived polio virus.What's interesting is this oral vaccine has been around for decades. Why are we seeing these cases pop up now?Well, I think we're not just seeing these cases pop up now. We've been seeing them pop up throughout the use of this particular vaccine. It's just that it's popped up in a place like New York, which hasn't had polio in a long, long time. The risk of these things emerging are very, very low. And the reason why we use this particular vaccine is that it has the ability to interrupt person-to-person spread. There's another vaccine that is used. It's called the inactivated polio vaccine — or the Salk vaccine, if you like — and it's injected. It contains an inactivated polio vaccine and it offers excellent personal protection. But the drawback on that is [that] it offers very limited ability to be able to stop person-to-person spread of the virus, and in an eradication effort, that's what we're really after.So, is there any risk of a widespread outbreak in places like the US and the UK of polio now? I mean, should we be worried?I would say the following: I think both the UK and the US did a fantastic job in identifying a public health risk. You know, there's one case in New York, which is a paralytic case — one person paralyzed by the disease, which is tragic — but for the most part, the virus has been only isolated in sewage systems. So, the local authorities have identified this risk and are, right now, doing all the right things in addressing this public health risk. And the name of the game now is to make sure that you do not allow polio to reestablish a foothold in your community. And to do that, you make sure that your population is fully vaccinated.There's been such a push to get people vaccinated against COVID-19, with messaging about how the vaccine is safe and effective, there's no risk of getting COVID-19 from the vaccine. Do you worry about how this news about polio might impact people's decisions to get vaccinated against COVID-19 or other viruses?We're worried about any person who is not vaccinated against polio, because then that individual is not protected. And certainly the vaccine that's being used in the United States, the inactivated polio vaccine, it's one of the safest, if not the safest vaccine that is out there. It is a killed vaccine virus, so there is absolutely no chance of catching polio from it. There is no chance that you would see these vaccine-derived polio cases arise with inactivated polio vaccines. The only thing that it will do, is to protect you from lifelong paralysis. And, most of us have forgotten what polio actually is. It is a devastating, deadly disease. It is an extremely painful disease. And it is so easily preventable, and so, if it's a matter of getting one injection in the arm, which is completely safe, and then be sure and be assured that you're not going to catch this disease, I think it's worth doing, definitely.

This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.

Related: An upcoming vaccine drive in Afghanistan is an ‘unprecedented opportunity’ to eradicate polio, UN official says

Dozens lay down outside the US embassy as part of an action against leaf mines

At the United States Embassy in the capital of the Russian Federation, an action is being held with reference to the anti-personnel mines “Petal”, which are used by the Armed Forces of Ukraine against the civilian population of the Donetsk People's Republic. Dozens of citizens decided to lie on the ground next to the stickers of the mines. 

Ukrainian military scatter “Petals” in Donetsk, Lisichansk, Makeevka and other settlements of the DPR. Moscow activists called for the Kiev government to be held accountable for this. They believe that the US authorities need to pay attention to civilians who become victims of the criminal actions of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, the Readovka Telegram channel reports.

Earlier it was reported that about a dozen images of anti-personnel min “Petal”. The images include text that says Ukraine continues to use Petals. against the civilian population.

Let us remind you that the mines «Petal» prohibited by the Ottawa Convention, which Ukraine ratified in 2005. The projectile is especially dangerous for the civilian population, because it is difficult to recognize it due to its unusual shape. In addition, the mine can work spontaneously when heated by the sun's rays.

Earlier it was reported that the Russian Federation sent UN Secretary General António Guterres data on the use of these explosive devices by the Armed Forces of Ukraine. Relevant photos were attached to the appeal.

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Received an explanation of the new US strikes in Syria

The race for oil continues, but relations between Iran and the United States will not change

Following the tension over Taiwan and the start of military exercises in South Korea, there is a reason to recall the Middle East “hot spots” . The United States also attacked the Syrian Deir ez-Zor. The airstrikes were attributed to America's response to an attack against the Al-Tanf military base in Syria on August 15th. What are the consequences of Washington's actions – Let's understand our material.

Photo: AP

On Tuesday, President Joe Biden ordered airstrikes against Iranian-backed groups in Syria, CNN reported. The order comes just over a week after several rockets landed near a US military base in northeast Syria.

Biden “directed these strikes in accordance with his authority.” under Article II, to defend and protect US personnel by disrupting or deterring attacks by Iranian-backed groups,” the US Central Command said in an official statement.

Joe Buccino, spokesman for the Central Command (CENTCOM), also said in a statement that “the airstrikes carried out by the US military were directed against Iranian-backed groups in Deir ez-Zor in Syria. The strikes targeted infrastructure facilities used by groups associated with the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.” (IRGC).

Buccino added that these targeted strikes are designed to protect US forces from attacks similar to those carried out on August 15 against US personnel by Iranian-backed groups.

Recall that last week several rockets were fired at the Green Village military base in northeastern Syria. No one was hurt in the attack. On Monday, US-led coalition forces disabled several drones.

Buccino also told CNN that the US had targeted a group of bunkers used to store ammunition and logistical support for pro-Iranian groups in Syria. He also added that the US military controlled a total of 13 bunkers for more than 400 hours.

The attack was made on 11 bunkers, because the US, according to Buccino, cannot be sure that there are no people in the other two bunkers. However, foreign media noted that the strike was nevertheless carried out on 9 bunkers, since there was a small crowd of people near two more targets.

Although the airstrike on shelters was carried out in response to the attack on August 15, press the CENTCOM secretary noted that they were not used by the Iranian militias in this particular attack.

A U.S. official has previously said the attacked base has a “small number” of coalition forces, including US military personnel.

The US interest in Deir ez-Zor does not look like just defending one's own dignity. When it comes to this specific territorial zone, the personal interests of the States come to the fore.

– There are deposits of Syrian oil in Deir ez-Zor, – comments the director of the “Center for the Study of the Middle East and Central Asia” Semyon Bagdasarov. – This oil is controlled by the Syrian Democratic Forces, which is patronized by the United States. The Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps wants these deposits to belong to Syria. The Americans do not like this, which is why there was a blow to the IRGC units. But I believe that this situation will not affect the relations between Iran and America in any way. Tehran, I think, will still sign an agreement on the nuclear program and I don’t think that there will be any negative moments.

It’s also not worth talking about another escalation of the conflict, the expert believes, “There is a hot spot in the Syrian direction can organize Turkey. This is definitely so. But the United States to a lesser extent, so there is no need to talk about a negative scenario.

According to official figures, the United States maintains about 900 troops in Syria. They are located between the At-Tanf base and the country's eastern oil fields.

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Reuters announces largest US aid package for Ukraine

Reuters reported on the largest new US aid package for Ukraine for $3 billion The new package will be the largest of all that the United States has provided since the outbreak of hostilities in Ukraine. We are talking about an amount of about $3 billion. Before that, the maximum amount of assistance was $1 billion media=”(max-width: 320px) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi)” >

US on Wednesday, August 24 , will announce the next package of military assistance to Ukraine in the amount of about $ 3 billion, Reuters reports, citing a source in the US government.

The new package will be the largest of all that Washington has provided since the beginning of hostilities in Ukraine, the agency notes. Prior to this, the maximum amount of assistance was $1 billion.

It is being prepared for Ukraine's Independence Day, which Ukraine celebrates on August 24.

U.S. officials told the AP that the money will be used to fund contracts for drones and other weapons that will allow Kyiv to bolster its defenses in the medium to long term. Previous arms shipments were aimed at meeting Ukraine's urgent military needs and included weapons that are already in the Pentagon's warehouses and can be shipped as soon as possible, the agency said.

The last time the United States announced military aid to Kyiv was on August 19. Then it was about the amount of $ 775 million. As specified in the Pentagon, the next package includes additional shells for American HIMARS multiple launch rocket systems, 16 105-mm howitzers that the UK had previously supplied to Ukraine, 15 ScanEagle reconnaissance drones, 40 MaxxPro Mine Resistant Ambush armored personnel carriers Protected with mine rollers, additional HARM high-speed anti-radar missiles, 1,500 TOW anti-tank missile systems, 1,000 Javelin man-portable anti-tank missile systems, etc.

Politico, citing a knowledgeable source, wrote that the United States in the future, they are going to transfer guided projectiles for Excalibur howitzers to the Ukrainian side.

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In total, since President Joe Biden came to power, the United States has allocated about $ 10.6 billion to Ukraine for military needs. The country has provided more than $12.6 billion to Kyiv since 2014.

Russia has repeatedly criticized Western arms sales to Kyiv, with President Vladimir Putin claiming in early June that the Russian military was “clicking like nuts” American weapons in Ukraine.

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Antonov: Russian START inspections in the US blocked due to sanctions

Russian Ambassador to Washington Anatoly Antonov, commenting on State Department statements that Washington's anti-Russian sanctions do not prevent the Russian side from carrying out inspection activities in the United States , said the restrictive measures of the United States and their allies in relation to Moscow create conditions under which Russia's inspections in the United States under the Treaty on Measures for the Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START, START-3) are “difficult, if not blocked.”

Antonov pointed out the lack of normal air communication with the United States, the closure of airspace for the passage of Russian aircraft to the United States, problems with obtaining visas for members of the inspection teams and flight crews. All this makes checks impossible, the Russian representative pointed out.

Meanwhile, Russia continues its special operation in Ukraine. Zelensky's office announced the preparation of a document on security guarantees for Ukraine by August 29. Meanwhile, Deputy Chairman of the Security Council of Russia Dmitry Medvedev said that those responsible for the death of Daria Dugina would be found and punished. The father of Natalya Vovk, a suspect in the murder of Dugina, said that she served in the Armed Forces of Ukraine and left for Europe as a refugee, but then returned to Ukraine. Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that he considers it his goal to organize a meeting of his colleagues from Russia and Ukraine, Vladimir Putin and Vladimir Zelensky, in the near future. Read online here.

Источник www.mk.ru

Politico learned about US plans to transfer Excalibur guided missiles to Kyiv

According to the publication, howitzer guided missiles are not included in the upcoming $775 million aid package, the United States is going to supply them in the future 0/71/756610089773710.jpg 673w” media=”(max-width: 320px) and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2), (max-width: 320px) and (min-resolution: 192dpi) ” >

Politico learned about US plans to transfer Excalibur guided missiles to Kyiv

The United States is going to send guided missiles for Excalibur howitzers to Ukraine in the future, Politico writes citing an informed source.

The interlocutor of the publication clarified that Excalibur is not included in the next aid package.

Excalibur— long-range high-precision projectiles. This is a development of Raytheon Missiles & Defense. The deviation from the target is less than two meters. According to the company, one such projectile can replace, on average, at least ten conventional ones. The Excalibur is compatible with artillery pieces such as the British 155mm M777 howitzer, the Swedish 155mm Archer and the German PzH 2000. It has been adopted by Sweden, Canada, Australia, Jordan, India, Spain and the Netherlands.

On August 19, US President Joe Biden ordered $775 million in additional military assistance to be provided to Kyiv.

As specified in the Pentagon, the next package will include additional shells for American HIMARS multiple launch rocket systems, 16 105-mm howitzers and 36 thousand shells for them (previously, these howitzers, the US Department of Defense noted, were supplied to Ukraine by the UK), 15 reconnaissance drones ScanEagle, 40 MaxxPro Mine Resistant Ambush Protected armored personnel carriers with mine rollers, additional HARM high-speed anti-radar missiles, 1,500 TOW anti-tank missile systems, 1,000 Javelin man-portable anti-tank missile systems, etc.

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According to Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov, Moscow would not want Washington to become a party conflict in Ukraine. The Russian side has repeatedly warned the United States that its growing involvement in the situation in Ukraine is bringing them closer to turning into a conflict. And, “no matter how much they deny or deny,” the facts speak for themselves, Ryabkov noted.

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Experts assessed the US weapons promised to Ukraine: some types will be delivered for the first time

New air-to-air missiles and anti-tank systems

On August 19, the Pentagon announced a new $775 million military assistance package to Ukraine. Thus, the total amount of US deliveries from February 24, 2022 will be $9 .9 billion, and since 2014 – $12.6 billion. An expert from the Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies (CAST) assessed the range of weapons supplied from the United States.

In particular, deliveries of GMLRS precision-guided missiles for HIMARS missile systems have been announced, according to the telegram channel bmpd (CAST). The list also includes 16 towed howitzers of 105 mm caliber (possibly M119) and 36,000 shells for them; 15 Boeing ScanEagle tactical reconnaissance unmanned systems; 40 International MaxxPro MRAP armored vehicles with minesweeps.

In addition, 50 HMMWV armored vehicles were promised to Kyiv; additional deliveries of HARM anti-radar missiles; 1500 anti-tank guided missiles of the TOW complex; 1000 anti-tank guided missiles of the Javelin complex; 2000 anti-tank rounds for Carl-Gustaf hand-held anti-tank grenade launchers.

The list also includes various military equipment, including sights, thermal imagers, and mine protection equipment.

According to the CAST expert, for the first time, Ukraine has announced the provision of anti-tank missile systems (ATGM) TOW: “Oddly enough, this most massive American and Western ATGM has not yet been delivered to the Ukrainian side.”

The delivery of ScanEagle drones, which are widely distributed among American allies and were supplied even Afghanistan.

In addition, for the first time, the Pentagon “legalized” the supply of HARM anti-radar missiles and International MaxxPro armored vehicles of the MRAP class to Ukraine, although both of these types of weapons have already “lit up” with the Armed Forces of Ukraine.

Источник www.mk.ru

The professor predicted direct US intervention in the event of a major Russian victory in Ukraine

Photo: pixabay.com

The situation around the Russian NVO in Ukraine could turn into US intervention in the conflict. This prediction was made by University of Chicago political science professor John Mearsheimer in an article for Foreign Affairs.

The expert describes several scenarios for American intervention at once.

If the situation is not resolved within a year, Washington, as the author believes, he may think about introducing small contingents of ground troops to help Kyiv.

A more likely scenario for US intervention, according to an American political scientist, is if the Ukrainian army “starts to fall apart, and Russia wins a major victory.” The administration of US President Joe Biden does not intend to allow such an outcome, and the United States could try to reverse the situation by deciding to directly participate in the hostilities.

There is a third option that Mearsheimer describes. It suggests unintentional escalation. So, according to this version, Washington, unwittingly, will be drawn into a military conflict by some unforeseen event that “develops in an upward spiral.”

Источник www.mk.ru

Reuters learned about US plans to allocate another $ 800 million in military assistance to Ukraine

This week, the US will announce another $800 million military aid package to Ukraine. Biden uses his powers to transfer “surplus weapons” from US stockpiles

On Friday, August 19, the United States will announce a new $800 million military aid package for Ukraine, Reuters reports, citing three sources.

According to interlocutors, the President Joe Biden will use the powers of the head of state, which allows him to transfer “surplus weapons” from US stocks. The agency does not specify what kind of weapons it is.

A week earlier, on August 8, the US authorities announced that they were allocating $1 billion to help Ukraine. The package included missiles for HIMARS multiple launch rocket systems, ammunition for NASAMS anti-aircraft missile systems, 50 M113 armored medical vehicles, as well as artillery ammunition, a thousand portable anti-tank systems FGM-148 Javelin, medicines and explosives.

The total volume of US military assistance to Ukraine thus rose to $9.8 billion since the start of the Russian military operation in February.

After the start of the conflict, Western countries stepped up arms supplies to Kyiv. In particular, Ukraine received 16 HIMARS multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS) from the United States, in total the Pentagon promised more than 20 such systems. The UK also supplies the Ukrainian side with MLRS. Among other weapons sent to the country, & mdash; Javelin and NLAW anti-tank systems, Stinger anti-aircraft systems, Starstreak MANPADS and others. President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky said that due to additional supplies there is an opportunity for a “tipping point” in the conflict.

The Russian authorities criticize Western arms supplies to Ukraine, arguing that this threatens to escalate and only “prolong the conflict.” The Ministry of Foreign Affairs says that the supply of long-range weapons to Kyiv will lead to the fact that “the geographical objectives of the special operation will be pushed back even further”,

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US educators step up to help displaced Ukrainians continue their studies

“MuiTypography-root-134 MuiTypography-h1-139″>US educators step up to help displaced Ukrainians continue their studies

Several American-based online learning platforms have made their coursework free to Ukrainians whose education has been upended by the war in their country. Students, as well as universities, are embracing the new offerings.

The WorldAugust 18, 2022 · 2:15 PM EDT

Destroyed library in the school where a graduation ceremony, called the Last School Bell, was supposed to take place in Kharkiv, Ukraine, June 2, 2022.

Andrii Marienko/AP

In February, Anna Myslytska was studying at the Kyiv School of Economics when the war came to her family’s hometown. A Russian missile hit a neighboring block.

“I was supposed to have an English exam. I was preparing for that exam,” Myslytska, 18, recalled. “And then, the next day, that all just disappeared. You were figuring out what was more valuable to put in your rucksack to take with you.”

The university shut down. Myslytska and her family fled to Romania before resettling in eastern Spain where she’s rebuilding a new life. With her country in chaos, she’s managed to continue her education with remarkably little disruption. She took her economics and general studies courses completely online, including a Greek and Roman mythology class taught by a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and produced by an American company, Coursera.

Myslytska said it’s a class she wouldn’t have taken before, because it’s a subject not linked to her field of study — economics.

Kyiv School of Economics student Anna Myslytska fled Ukraine when Russian missiles destroyed her hometown. She’s continued her education, taking courses online from Spain.

Credit:

Courtesy of Anna Myslytska

In Ukraine, it’s estimated that half of all universities switched to online teaching by the end of March and more are likely to reopen in an online format during this coming academic year.

Several American-based online learning platforms, such as Coursera and Boston-based edX, have made their coursework free to Ukrainians whose education has been upended by the war. Students, as well as universities, are embracing the new offerings.

“When the unfortunate war started in Ukraine, we felt that we had to act,” said Anant Agarwal, founder and CEO of edX, a nonprofit created 10 years ago by computer scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The platform offers existing courses taught by professors at more than 160 colleges and universities.

Citing the Russian government’s military actions against Ukraine, edX severed its relationship with Russian institutions.

“We had a number of universities in Russia who we had partnered with, and so, one of the actions that we took was that we cut our ties with the Russian institutions,” Agarwal said.

Then, in March, edX announced it would work with the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine to offer all Ukrainian colleges access to its platform.

Anant Agarwal speaks at the TEDx conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, in June 2013.

Credit:

 TEDx under a Creative Commons license

“These are courses and programs on our platform that Ukrainian students who are registered at the universities can now take up completely for free,” Agarwal explained.

Since February, edX says it’s served nearly 3,000 students like Myslytska at more than 40 Ukrainian institutions. The courses are offered in English, however, so only a minority of students can take them.

Some of the most popular courses for Ukrainian students include Exercising Leadership and Introduction to Computer Science — both from Harvard — and Advanced Data Structures from New York University.

For institutions like the Kyiv School of Economics, which offers mostly business classes, these new broad-based classes mark a major shift.

“We reshaped the curriculum,” said Yegor Stadny, vice president for undergraduate programs at the economics school.

Stadny said the school has resumed some in-person classes, but online courses offered by Ukrainian and American universities have been critical in providing shell-shocked students with more stability and opportunity.

“The mental condition of our students was not so good,” he said. “We just thought it would be better to make the curriculum and the schedule more flexible.”

Higher education is a ‘bulwark’ against authoritarianism

Since the start of the war, more than 1,500 Ukrainian educational institutions have been partially or totally destroyed in what Ukrainian academics say is Russia’s deliberate attempt to undermine their ability to teach their own history and culture. Russian soldiers have burned books, libraries and archives. They've shelled theaters and schools, including the main campus of Kharkiv University.

“The most important thing right now for Ukrainian higher ed is to try to continue in an era when many higher educational institutions have been destroyed,” said Alexandra Hrycak, who teaches sociology at Reed College in Portland, where her research focuses on Ukraine.

Hrycak’s parents immigrated to the United States after the Soviet Army occupied their hometown and declared them — and their families — “enemies of the people.”

Today, she said, the Kremlin is trying to turn back the clock to that era filled with misinformation, indoctrination and silencing.

“Russia really seeks to eliminate Ukraine from the map and replace it with some kind of proxy state,” Hrycak said.

That’s why, she said, Ukrainian professors seeking academic freedom are moving online, using their smartphones to record violent acts of war, teaching courses from bunkers and preserving their culture.

“There has been a deliberate attempt by Russian occupying forces to expunge textbooks and other kinds of learning materials and replace them with a Russian curriculum that completely erases Ukrainian history,” she said.

“Higher education is a bulwark against the threat of authoritarianism,” said Georgetown University President John DeGioia, who applauds how educators in the US have stepped up to help Ukrainians stay in school.

In 2012, Georgetown was one of the first universities to make some of its courses available for free online. Back in 2020, Georgetown commissioned a study which found that education can help tame authoritarian attitudes in the United States and abroad.

DeGioa said the mission of the American university goes beyond coursework. Essential parts include the formation of young people’s intellect, faculty research and contribution to the common good.

“These are three inextricably linked elements, but all three contribute to this challenge of responding to the threat of authoritarianism,” DeGioia said, adding that authoritarian tendencies — preferring strongman leaders and uniformity — are at odds with the mission of a university that supports autonomy and diversity.

For students like Myslystka, the free, online courses have been invaluable. But while she’s learning a lot in her Ukrainian and American-based courses online, she said, she’s eager to return to Kyiv and resume in-person classes.

Like many Ukrainians, she fears that if the educated don’t go back to rebuild the country, Ukraine will never fully recover from the war.

“The more you know, the more tools you have in your brain to deal with some problems, including huge problems like the Russian invasion,” she said.